Gender equality and women's empowerment

This viewpoint emphasizes gendered perspectives and reflects on gender roles for sustainability-focused governance. It argues that when considering gender in this context, not only equity, or power-plays between genders are at stake; in addition, for effective ocean governance, an irreducible contribution of female voices is necessary. Some key contributions of women in the field of ocean governance-related research are described as examples. If women, for instance, are not included in fisheries management, we miss the complete picture of social-ecological linkages of marine ecosystems.
Mothers are often perceived as key agents in safeguarding the interests of children. If the assumption that women, given the opportunity, are more likely than men to see to the interests of children is true, children can be expected to be less exposed to severe forms of deprivation in countries where women have a relatively strong position in society. The hypotheses that fewer children are exposed to health deprivation and to severe forms of food deprivation in countries where there is a high degree of gender equity are tested.
Elsevier, Neuron, Volume 99, 22 August 2018
As scientists and engineers, we must recognize the overwhelming evidence that we each harbor bias that influences our professional decisions. Yet, solving today's increasingly complex public health challenges requires diverse perspectives from multidisciplinary teams. We all have the opportunity to actively promote a more representative scientific community; let's harness the power of collective action to build diverse teams that deliver the most innovative science. Research shows that we all harbor bias that influences professional decisions.
Background: In Germany, currently two out of three medical students are female. Several studies corroborate that medical students show a significantly higher prevalence of stress-related mental disorders than the population in general. Aims: We aimed to evaluate, if gender has an influence on the distribution of mental stress parameters and learning style among male and female medical students.
Stop harrasment #metoo
As employers continue to deal with the fallout of the #MeToo movement, the importance of effective sexual harassment training has become more clear. Having a workplace that is free of sexual harassment supports SDGs 5, 8 and 10. This article provides advice on why effective sexual harassment training is needed now more than ever, and best practices that apply no matter where you are.
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 191-214

Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses youth dating homicides based on the work of domestic violence death review committees and identify recommendations from individual cases and overall patterns of findings from these deaths
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 25-51

Advancing SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses the theories behind partner abuse and the implications of these for prevention planning.
Elsevier,

Adolescent Dating Violence: Theory, Research, and Prevention, 2018, Pages 437-466

Advancing SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter reviews college-based dating violence prevention programming and examines the limitations of current research practices, as well as the legal, health and policy implications.
Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter reviews the evidence from both high- as well as LMIC regarding the effectiveness of interventions to address intimate partner and sexual violence among adolescents, including school and community-based approaches.
Elsevier,

Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Resistance: Theory, Research, and Practice, 2018, Pages 175-193

Researchers have found a variety of effective treatments for individuals with sexual assault histories, particularly for those presenting with posttraumatic stress disorder, depending on their mental health presentations. However, many individuals may not be aware of these resources. Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses how sexual assault risk reduction and resistance education programming is an excellent setting to provide individuals with these resources for themselves or to share with friends and/or family.

Pages