Gender equality and women's empowerment

Elsevier,

International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Volume 47, December 2016, Pages 71-84

Equality before the law is a fundamental principle of modern law, however, examining access to justice for men and women shows that women face certain barriers in accessing justice. This paper details a study in Turkey on the linkages between SDG 5 gender equality and SDG 16 peace, justice and strong institutions.
The Role of Gender-based Innovations for the UN Sustainable Development Goals: Toward 2030: Better Science and Technology for All (Edition 1)
The Elsevier Foundation is committed to advancing SDG 5 and has developed a 3-year strategic partnership with Portia, an organisation that women and men have the same opportunities for engagement and advancement in science. Building on research drawn from recent Gender Summits, Portia will advance sex-gender sensitive research, innovation, development and deeper understanding through a series of annual SDG reports and the creation of a Gender Summit Consortium.
As part of the UK Government’s Women in Finance Charter, 72 firms have agreed to publish progress on gender equality annually, ahead of gender pay reporting Regulations in 2017. Sixty firms in the UK have committed to having at least 30% of women in senior roles by 2021. Thirteen finance companies are aiming to have complete gender parity in senior roles by 2021. These steps directly align with SDG 10.4 to adopt policies, wage and social protection policies, to progressively achieve greater equality.
Elsevier,

International Encyclopedia of Public Health (Second Edition), 2017, Pages 337-343

This article advances SDGs 3, 5, and 16 by providing a broad overview of global violence aginst women and highlighting the difference health professionals can make for women who experience violence in its multiple forms.
Elsevier,

International Encyclopedia of Public Health (Second Edition), 2017, Pages 491-498

This article advances SDGs 3, 5, and 16 by demonstrating how gender power inequalities are at the root of sexual violence against women and outlining ways to prevent sexual violence and mitigate the mental and physical health impacts of rape.
ICIS,

ICIS Special Report, EPCA, 26 September 2016

Increasing diversity and inclusion in the petrochemical workforce
There is a strong business case for increasing diversity and inclusion in the petrochemical workforce. EPCA’s new initiative on the subject aims to discover best practice and embed diversity and inclusion into management thinking and company DNA. This is important for advancing SDG 10.2 to empower and promote the social, economic and political inclusion of all, irrespective of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion or economic or other status.
Contributing to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter discusses how spousal violence interventions must be interdisciplinary, integrated, and coordinated to be effective and avoid secondary victimisation.
There have been various ways on how to address the practice of violence in a spousal environment. Linked to SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter presents an approach to violence that is split into three paths, namely physical, psychological and sexual violence. Psychological violence includes stalking, financial abuse and social isolation. However, the authors emphasise that these are just categories of study and analysis and in real life, they coexist within aggression.
Spousal violence carries within itself a set of consequences that go beyond bruises, hematomas or other physical injuries. However, very little attention has been given to the psychological impact of spousal violence due to a generated common idea that violence is only serious when it leaves bruises or exposed fractures. Furthering SDGs 3 and 5, this chapter emphasises the impact that violence represents in terms of mood, anxiety and even post-traumatic stress.
Elsevier,

Social Science & Medicine, Volume 157, May 2016, Pages 27-30

Nordic countries are the most gender equal countries in the world, but at the same time they have disproportionally high prevalence rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. This paper explores a number of theoretical and methodological issues that may help to understand this paradox, contributing to SDGs 3 and 5.

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