Education

Education holds a paramount relationship with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as delineated by the United Nations in 2015. It is not only recognized in its standalone form in SDG 4, which strives to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”, but also serves as an enabler of other SDGs, highlighting its cross-cutting impact across multiple facets of development. It acts as the foundation stone of knowledge, fostering an understanding of complex socio-economic dynamics that are critical for the attainment of other goals.

Consider, for instance, how education impacts SDG 1 - No Poverty. The increased earning potential offered by quality education is a powerful tool in breaking the poverty cycle. Similarly, in relation to SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-being, education is instrumental in driving better health outcomes by fostering understanding of healthy lifestyles, disease prevention, and the benefits of timely medical intervention.

Addressing the climate crisis (SDG 13) also necessitates education, as it prepares individuals to understand the intricate relationships between human activities and their environmental impact, and to seek sustainable solutions. Moreover, achieving gender equality (SDG 5) is intrinsically tied to education, as access to quality learning opportunities for girls and women empowers them, promotes their participation in decision-making processes, and helps in overturning deeply entrenched societal biases.

Quality education also fosters innovation and infrastructure development (SDG 9), as it equips individuals with the technical and creative skills necessary to devise advanced technologies and infrastructures. Moreover, education fosters peace and justice (SDG 16) by promoting a culture of peace, non-violence, global citizenship, and appreciation of cultural diversity.

In this multifaceted role, education serves as a catalyst in the process of sustainable development. However, these interconnections necessitate that education systems themselves are made more inclusive, resilient, and sustainable. The challenges of the 21st century, such as the digital divide and the increasing need for lifelong learning, require urgent attention to ensure education continues to play its role effectively. Education is the key that unlocks the potential of all other SDGs, making its universal attainment not just a goal, but a pre-requisite for a sustainable future.

With over 700 million illiterate adults worldwide, governments in many developing countries have implemented adult literacy programs. Typically these programs have low rates of success partly because the quality of teaching is heterogeneous. Standardization of teaching provided by computer-aided instruction might be a solution. However, there is little rigorous evidence of the effectiveness of computer-based adult literacy programs in delivering high-quality literacy and numeracy in the developing world.
The aim of the conference is to examine the evolving expectations, available solutions, measurements and best practices associated with the optimization of research strategies. The theme of the 2017 conference will be "Universities and the Power of Data — Science for a Sustainable Society" and will focus on crucial areas such as sustainability, diversity, and the Power of Data in research. The event helps to advance SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 10 Reduced inequalities.
Elsevier published Sustainability Science in a Global Landscape which analysed the sustainability science research according to six themes: Dignity, People, Prosperity, Planet, Justice, and Partnership. Key data has since been updated covering 2011 to 2015 for the top 15 countries  in sustainability science output.
Elsevier, World Development, Volume 94, 1 June 2017
Existing evidence on the impacts of parental education on child nutrition is plagued by both internal and external validity concerns. In this paper we try to address these concerns through a novel econometric analysis of 376,992 preschool children from 56 developing countries. We compare a naïve least square model to specifications that include cluster fixed effects and cohort-based educational rankings to reduce biases from omitted variables before gauging sensitivity to sub-samples and exploring potential explanations of education-nutrition linkages.
Objectives malaria causes complications during 80% of all pregnancies in Uganda. However, only 48% of Ugandan pregnant women took one dose of intermittent preventive therapy while merely 27% took the second dose during 2011. This study investigated midwives’ provision of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe District of Uganda. Design a quantitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting prenatal clinics (n=16) in the Buikwe District of Uganda Respondents questionnaires were completed by 40 (out of a population of 45) midwives.
The process of decision making can be critical in various ways. In particular, because it determines the path towards or away from sustainable development. In this context, the present study examined the relationship between rationalities for decisions making processes and sustainable development in order to gain a better understanding of how to promote a more sustainable development model.
Elsevier, Emotion, Space and Society, Volume 22, 1 February 2017
Drawing on discussions with Kenyan, Mexican and British teachers, this paper reports on emotional responses to international socio-economic inequality. Emotional regimes are explored to identify what ‘appropriate’ responses to inequality are in a variety of local and national contexts. These include rural and urban settings, and social milieus ranging from elite to deprived. Politeness, hand-wringing and humour can create a protective distance; while sadness, anger and hope for change connect with the issue of inequality and challenge the associated injustices.
Elsevier, Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Volume 30, 1 February 2017
Study Objective Produce Girl Talk, a free smartphone application containing comprehensive sexual health information, and determine the application's desirability and appeal among teenage girls. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions Thirty-nine girls ages 12 to 17 years from Rhode Island participated in a 2-phase prospective study. In phase I, 22 girls assessed a sexual health questionnaire in focus groups. In phase II, 17 girls with iPhones used Girl Talk for 2 weeks and answered the revised sexual health questionnaire and interview questions before and after use.
Children at Imperial College London
The Elsevier Foundation partners with Imperial College London to support a high-tech makerspace next to the college. The programme offers 14 to 18 year-olds from one of London's most disadvanataged communities the opportunity to enhance soft skills and engage with cutting-edge science, engineering and design through workshops, afterscool clubs, and mentoring. The maker challange programmes offer important enrichment to young people, who would not otherwise have this explosure, and further support both SDG 4 and SDG 17.
Background As global efforts to increase the nursing and midwifery workforce intensify to improve access and quality of healthcare, clinical nursing and midwifery research must increase concomitantly to provide a solid evidence base for these clinicians. To maximize research resources in resource-poor regions, the research team collaborated with regional experts in southern and eastern African countries to convene a Research Summit in Nairobi, Kenya.

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