Education

Education holds a paramount relationship with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as delineated by the United Nations in 2015. It is not only recognized in its standalone form in SDG 4, which strives to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”, but also serves as an enabler of other SDGs, highlighting its cross-cutting impact across multiple facets of development. It acts as the foundation stone of knowledge, fostering an understanding of complex socio-economic dynamics that are critical for the attainment of other goals.

Consider, for instance, how education impacts SDG 1 - No Poverty. The increased earning potential offered by quality education is a powerful tool in breaking the poverty cycle. Similarly, in relation to SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-being, education is instrumental in driving better health outcomes by fostering understanding of healthy lifestyles, disease prevention, and the benefits of timely medical intervention.

Addressing the climate crisis (SDG 13) also necessitates education, as it prepares individuals to understand the intricate relationships between human activities and their environmental impact, and to seek sustainable solutions. Moreover, achieving gender equality (SDG 5) is intrinsically tied to education, as access to quality learning opportunities for girls and women empowers them, promotes their participation in decision-making processes, and helps in overturning deeply entrenched societal biases.

Quality education also fosters innovation and infrastructure development (SDG 9), as it equips individuals with the technical and creative skills necessary to devise advanced technologies and infrastructures. Moreover, education fosters peace and justice (SDG 16) by promoting a culture of peace, non-violence, global citizenship, and appreciation of cultural diversity.

In this multifaceted role, education serves as a catalyst in the process of sustainable development. However, these interconnections necessitate that education systems themselves are made more inclusive, resilient, and sustainable. The challenges of the 21st century, such as the digital divide and the increasing need for lifelong learning, require urgent attention to ensure education continues to play its role effectively. Education is the key that unlocks the potential of all other SDGs, making its universal attainment not just a goal, but a pre-requisite for a sustainable future.

Elsevier, Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Volume 30, 1 February 2017
Study Objective Produce Girl Talk, a free smartphone application containing comprehensive sexual health information, and determine the application's desirability and appeal among teenage girls. Design, Setting, Participants, and Interventions Thirty-nine girls ages 12 to 17 years from Rhode Island participated in a 2-phase prospective study. In phase I, 22 girls assessed a sexual health questionnaire in focus groups. In phase II, 17 girls with iPhones used Girl Talk for 2 weeks and answered the revised sexual health questionnaire and interview questions before and after use.
Children at Imperial College London
The Elsevier Foundation partners with Imperial College London to support a high-tech makerspace next to the college. The programme offers 14 to 18 year-olds from one of London's most disadvanataged communities the opportunity to enhance soft skills and engage with cutting-edge science, engineering and design through workshops, afterscool clubs, and mentoring. The maker challange programmes offer important enrichment to young people, who would not otherwise have this explosure, and further support both SDG 4 and SDG 17.
Background As global efforts to increase the nursing and midwifery workforce intensify to improve access and quality of healthcare, clinical nursing and midwifery research must increase concomitantly to provide a solid evidence base for these clinicians. To maximize research resources in resource-poor regions, the research team collaborated with regional experts in southern and eastern African countries to convene a Research Summit in Nairobi, Kenya.
The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business — regardless of size, sector or geography — to take leading action in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It illustrates how the five leadership qualities of Ambition, Collaboration, Accountability, Consistency, and Intentional can be applied to a business' strategy, business model, products, supply chain, partnerships, and operations to raise the bar and create impact at scale. The Blueprint is a tool for any business that is ready to advance its principled approach to SDG action to become a leader. This chapter relates specifically to SDG 4.
The HPCC Systems Team collaborates with multiple higher learning institutions globally to help train and develop the future managers of Big Data projects. Participating institutions receive free training classes and materials to learn the platform and help incorporate it into their curriculum. Students benefit from learning and working with a platform that was designed from the ground up by industry leader, LexisNexis. This programme advances SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 9.B to support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries.
HPCC training
HPCC Systems offers free introductory online training classes for anyone wanting to learn the basics of the ECL programming language and the open source HPCC Systems platform. Included in the training are self-paced lessons, lab exercises and a moderated Q&A forum to increase proficiency for solving Big Data problems. HPCC Systems training advances SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 9.B to support domestic technology development, research and innovation in developing countries.
The transition from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has shifted the policy debate from growth to ‘quality of growth’ (QG). We explore a new dataset on QG by the IMF and classify 93 developing countries for the period 1990–2011 in terms of Hopefuls, Contenders and Best Performers. The aims are as follows: (i) to depict the contradiction between high-growth and poor social welfare and (ii) to assess the influence of education and health spending on the QG. We use quantile regressions to articulate least and best QG performers.
The New York Academy of Sciences’s Afterschool STEM Mentoring Program.
Recognising the need to support STEM education, as part of its overall commitment to SDG4, the Elsevier Foundation has partnered with the New York Academy of Sciences' (NYAS)to expand its after-school mentoring in STEM programme. Inspiring more than 1,300 Middle School students each year, the After School Program trains graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to mentor 8 -14 year olds. Now with funding from the Elsevier Foundation, the prohgramme will be expanded to reach underserved children.
The UK Government and the Local Government Association have launched the ‘Come Back to Social Work’ campaign to address the shortage of experienced social workers in adults and children’s services. The pilot will see 30 social workers offered 13 weeks’ training to help prepare them to re-enter practice in early 2017. This government campaign contributes to the advancement of SDG 4 to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all.

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