Energy

Given the challenge of offering a development perspective to a rapidly growing population, it might be tempting for Africa to pursue a strategy of fueling growth with the cheapest source of energy available and take care of the environment later. Such an approach, however, would disregard the social cost of fossil fuels, which the population would have to bear. Using the Sustainable Development Goals as a benchmark for inclusive and sustainable growth we identify the synergy effects provided by renewable energy.
Global anthropogenic activities resulting in the emission of harmful greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere have increased the challenges faced from climate change. The greater awareness of the need to mitigate climate variability has brought about intense focus on the adverse impacts of fossil-fuel based energy on the environment. Being the single largest source of carbon emissions, energy supply has attracted much attention and more so that, climate change impacts extend beyond national boundaries.
Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are being developed to comply with the intensification of environmental laws and policies. Techniques for carbon capture from exhaust gases include post-combustion, pre-combustion and oxy-combustion. CO2 separation in gas processing is also a relevant application, employing alternatives commonly used in post-combustion, sharing developments and pulling innovations (additional to innovations pushed by knowledge from basic and applied research).
Elsevier, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 71, 2017
In this paper, five most emerging renewable energy sources are analyzed. These emerging renewables are either special or advanced forms of the mainstream energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal, biofuels, biomass, and hydro) or brand new technologies. The five emerging renewable technologies discussed in this paper include marine energy, concentrated solar photovoltaics (CSP), enhanced geothermal energy (EGE), cellulosic ethanol, and artificial photosynthesis. Marine energy is divided into wave energy, tidal energy, tidal/ocean currents, salinity gradient, and ocean thermal energy conversion.
Elsevier, Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 1 January 2017
This paper discusses the CO2 footprint of California's drought during 2012–2014. We show that California drought significantly increased CO2 emissions of the energy sector by around 22 million metric tons, indicating 33% increase in the annual CO2 emissions compared to pre-drought conditions. We argue that CO2 emission of climate extremes deserve more attention, because their cumulative impacts on CO2 emissions are staggering. Most countries, including the United States, do not have a comprehensive a nationwide energy-water plan to minimize their CO2 emissions.
An effective response to climate change demands rapid replacement of fossil carbon energy sources. This must occur concurrently with an ongoing rise in total global energy consumption. While many modelled scenarios have been published claiming to show that a 100% renewable electricity system is achievable, there is no empirical or historical evidence that demonstrates that such systems are in fact feasible. Of the studies published to date, 24 have forecast regional, national or global energy requirements at sufficient detail to be considered potentially credible.
Elsevier,

Solar Energy Desalination Technology, Chapter 1, 2017, Pages 1–46

To advance goal 6 (clean water and sanitation), this chapter explores different desalination processes to make seawater drinkable, which is an obvious solution to any water shortages. Given the high-polluting energy required in the desalination process, solar-desalination technologies is considered.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Shale Oil and Gas, Chapter 3, 2017, Pages 29–43

This chapter advances SDGs 7 and 13 by discussing detection methods for fugitive methane and whether these gases can be captured and used for commercial opportunity.
The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business — regardless of size, sector or geography — to take leading action in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It illustrates how the five leadership qualities of Ambition, Collaboration, Accountability, Consistency, and Intentional can be applied to a business' strategy, business model, products, supply chain, partnerships, and operations to raise the bar and create impact at scale. The Blueprint is a tool for any business that is ready to advance its principled approach to SDG action to become a leader. This chapter relates specifically to SDG 7.
[Figure presented]Profs. Nik Kaltsoyannis and Steve Liddle joined the University of Manchester School of Chemistry in 2015 as co-directors of the Centre for Radiochemistry Research after having previously held chairs at, respectively, University College London and the University of Nottingham. They are also heads of computational and inorganic chemistry, respectively. Each has published ∼150 research articles, reviews, and book chapters and has extensive experience in f-element chemistry. Prof.

Pages