It is no secret to anyone living in Beirut or a similar modern city in a semi-arid tropical country in the summer that their home has become a concrete forest and an urban heat island. Old wood or stone houses and their gardens have been replaced by concrete towers and parking lots, in the name of development. The result is searing summer nights, a drastic loss of insect and avian biodiversity, and a large increase in energy usage for interior climate control. These problems are experienced in rapidly developing urban centers worldwide. Moreover, cities worldwide are struggling with waste disposal. Roof gardens can help solve both problems highlighting synergies with a number of SDGs, including 7 and 11.
Field trial visit to the Center of Excellence for Rice in Malaysia, left to right: Shahrizal Abdul, Rob van Daalen, Raudhah Talib, Dr. Suzana Yusup, Noor Hafizah Ramli and Abu Bakar Ahmad.
The winner of the first ever Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge, Dr Suzana Yusup, invited Rob van Daalen (publisher Chemistry and initiator of the Challenge) to make a site visit to see the progress of her project "Biopesticide for Improvement of Paddy Yield". The visit made clear that the Elsevier sustainability program and specifically this challenge have a positive impact on health, environment and society in local communities in Malaysia, enhancing efforts to advance SDGs 1, 6, 12 and 15.
This article highlights one of the winning proposals of the Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge - “Biopesticides for improved paddy yield” - led by researcher Dr. Suzana Yusup. Her work shows how bio-pesticides can be safer and more effective than traditional pesticides, contributing to SDGs 8, 12, 13 and 15.
This article serves to support SDG 14 (life below water) and SDG 12 (responsible consumption and production). Current international strategies and policies to reduce single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads) are reviewed.
The 2017 Responsible Tourism Awards, presented during World Responsible Tourism Day, are focused on the SDGs. The first three categories are looking for specific contributions to SDG 8, SDG 12, SDG 3 whilst the remaining two categories are open to businesses and other tourism organisations supporting the remaining 14 SDGs. Entries close on 31 August 2017.
Green waste left over from vegetable harvesting provides feed for sheep and is then returned to the soil as manure
Livestock has disappeared from swathes of England in the past 50 years as many growers became increasingly specialised. However as our soils increasingly suffer leaching, erosion and compaction from ever-heavier modern machinery, more and more arable farmers are reaping the benefits of bringing sheep and cattle back on to the land. Such measures help support SDG 12 Responsible Consumption and Production.
Using newly-released and globally available high-resolution remote sensing data on forest loss, the authors update the assessment of the cross-country determinants of deforestation in developing countries. Agricultural trade, relatively neglected to date, is found to be one of the main factors causing deforestation. Insights into the relationship between the levels of forestation and trade are vital for understanding how to address SDG 15.2 to promote the implementation of sustainable management of all types of forests.
Elsevier,

Agricultural Systems (Second Edition), Agroecology and Rural Innovation for Development, 2017, Pages 33-72

This book chapter addresses goals 11, 15, 12 and 13 by examining the ecological principles that provide a foundation for resilient and sustainable agriculture that supports rural livelihoods.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

Elsevier,

Materials Today, Volume 20, Issue 2, 2017, Pages 67-73

In 2013 alone nearly 50 million tons of e-waste was generated worldwide. The United Nations’ STEP initiative has reported that e-waste is expected to grow by 33% over the next 4 years and by 2030 obsolete computer waste will reach 1,000 million tons. This electronic waste often contain toxic substances and nearly 80–85% of electronic products are directly disposed of in landfills or incinerators. The researchers suggest a new technique where circuit boards from electronics can be crushed into nanodust by a cryo-mill. The dust can then be easily separated into its component elements for recycling. The researchers intend it to replace the current process of e-waste into landfills and advances SDG 12.

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