Advancing goal 17, this report seeks to inspire and guide companies, governments, cities and others involved in the implementation of Agenda 2030 to tap into the private capital markets and benefit from cheaper and more reliable capital to support the implementation of their SDG strategies. It introduces a roadmap for mainstream SDG bonds and corporate SDG finance to tap into the largest assets classes and respond to the specific financing challenges in emerging markets.
This guide explores the role of corporate finance and investments in scaling finance for the SDGs, including how FDI, financial intermediation and public-private partnerships can be a source of finance for less liquid SDG investments that cannot be invested directly by portfolio or institutional investors. This includes providing access to finance in countries with less developed financial markets or for SDG solutions that are too small or illiquid to attract portfolio investors. The report contributes to SDGs 8, 16 and 17.
While the public sector and public finance will be core to the implementation of the SDGs, it is widely acknowledged that the private sector and capital markets must also play a key role. This report furthers SDGs 8, 12 and 17 by seeking to inspire major players in the investment value chain to build a market for mainstream SDG investments, with enough scale, liquidity and diversification to attract large institutional investors and finance a broad set of private- and public-sector activities in support of the SDGs.
Investors, governments, and other stakeholders are increasingly demanding that companies demonstrate sustainable strategies aligned with the SDGs. A credible SDG strategy allows a company to clearly communicate its impact, facilitates easier access to the growing market for SDG financing, and connects investors with a pipeline of potential opportunities to address the SDG investment gap. This guide seeks to support companies looking to integrate the SDGs into their financial strategy and business model, contributing to SDGs 8, 12 and 17.
This report provides an assessment of how companies in the UN Global Compact are adopting the Ten Principles and taking action to deliver on the SDGs. It contributes to Goals 10, 12 and 17.
Focussing on SDGs 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals), this piece explores conflict prevention and the role of Resident Coordinators in fragile and conflict- affected countries without peace operations.
Linking to Goal 6 and Goal 17, this Guide to Water-Related Collective Action offers good practice to help companies establish enduring relationships with a broad spectrum of stakeholders, leaders, and individuals to advance sustainable water management.

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UN University

United Nations University, May 2018.

Contributing to SDGs 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals), this research seeks to understand if, when and how transitional justice, in combination with other conflict resolution tools, can contribute to transitions away from conflict in settings affected by major jihadist groups.
In this year’s Special Edition of the UN Global Compact-Accenture Strategy CEO Study, the world’s largest program of CEO research on sustainability, we focus our attention on goal 17, transforming partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals. Following a decade of research into the views of business leaders worldwide, we examine the views of UN leaders. As the UN Secretary-General calls for enhanced cooperation between the United Nations and the private sector, we ask agency heads and partnership practitioners across the UN system: what will it take to scale up partnerships to bring about transformational impact on the SDGs?

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UN University

Children and Extreme Violence, United Nations University, New York, October 2017. 

Contributing to SDGs 17 (Partnerships for the Goals) and 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions), the UN collaborated with academics in communications and psychology; practitioners in brand creation, marketing, and cause campaigns; social media experts and practitioners and entertainment content creators to gain a deeper understanding of recruitment typologies, messaging and intergroup competition involving children in the Islamic State.

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