Depression accounts for the largest burden of mental illness worldwide, with a global prevalence of 4·7% and an associated cost of US$1·15 trillion. Although psychological treatments are recommended as first-line interventions, most depressed people living in poor countries lack access to such treatments. This trial done in India is the first study to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychological treatment for depression in a lower middle-income country, showing acceptability, feasibility, and cost-effectiveness when delivered by lay health-workers and advancing knowledge on SDG 3.
The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business — regardless of size, sector or geography — to take leading action in support of the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It illustrates how the five leadership qualities of Ambition, Collaboration, Accountability, Consistency, and Intentional can be applied to a business' strategy, business model, products, supply chain, partnerships, and operations to raise the bar and create impact at scale. The Blueprint is a tool for any business that is ready to advance its principled approach to SDG action to become a leader. This chapter relates specifically to SDG 3.
This research aims to distinguishing hypothetical willingness from behavioural intentions to initiate HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Findings from this study contribute directly to SDG 3 (good health and well-being) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities).
The authors propose a new prediction model of infectious disease with new vaccination strategy based on network structures and dynamic replicator. They consider the subsidies of vaccine failure and the incentive strategy for medical treatment to promote that individuals take the initiative to vaccinate. Vaccination is key to the advancement of several of the targets of SDG 3.
This paper is about the importance educating midwives on malaria. Malaria complicates 80% of pregnancies in Uganda, therefore equipping midwives with the necessary information to deliver malaria-related in-service education to pregnant women could reduce infant and maternal mortality in Uganda. This relates to SDG 3 and in-particular the targets 3.1 concerned with maternal mortality and 3.3 concerned with ending the epidemic of malaria.
This paper examines the use of contraceptives and the social influence surrounding their use in Sub-Saharan Africa. Research shows that women wish to control birth numbers but few use contraception, thus increasing population and adding pressure on scarce resources, as well as contributing to increased mortality and general ill-health. This paper addresses SDG 3 (Good health and well-being) as well as SDG 5 (Gender equality).
The International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) and Childhood Cancer International (CCI) held a symposium at the 48th SIOP Congress in Dublin, Ireland, on Oct 19, 2016, entitled “Essential medicines for children with cancer: dynamics and challenges”. This joint position statement summarises the symposium's key consensus findings to galvanise the international oncology community to achieve sustained improvements in access to medicines for children with cancer, regardless of disease or geography supporting tagerts 3.2 and 3.4.
Elsevier,

Lancet Psychiatry Vol 4 No 1 January 2017

This Comment by Anita Riecher-Rössler explores the connections between goals 5 and goals 3: depression in women; the role of the sex hormones oestradiol and progesterone in anxiety, trauma-related, and stress-related disorders; schizophrenic psychoses in women; and violence against women, and its effects on mental health.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Psychiatry, Volume 4 No 1 January 2017

In this Comment, Louise Howard and colleagues review the mental health literature and report that many researchers are not considering or reporting the role of sex and gender within their studies. This “gender neutral” approach, they argue, is in fact gender biased, as it undermines scientific validity and efficiency, and means gender-sensitive treatments and services cannot be designed or delivered. The authors call for greater awareness of this issue by funders and journals, and gender parity in mental health research populations.
Kidney diseases (KDs), both acute and chronic, are recognized as major public health issues worldwide and important contributors to the rising burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). More than half of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) do not receive any treatment, especially in the low and low middle income countries (LMICs). Similarly, acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to about 1.7 million preventable deaths every year worldwide. There is a critical requirement for the development of an implementation framework tailored to the local needs of health systems and to optimize the quality of care for patients at risk for developing KD in limited-resource settings. SDG 3.4 specifically addresses reduction of premature mortality from NCDs.

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