Multi-stakeholder partnerships

Elsevier, World Development, Volume 66, February 01, 2015
Serious questions remain about the ability of NGOs to meet long-term transformative goals in their work for development and social justice. We investigate how, given their weak roots in civil society and the rising tide of technocracy that has swept through the world of foreign aid, most NGOs remain poorly placed to influence the real drivers of social change.
This report sets out five defining features of corporate sustainability, which the Global Compact asks businesses to strive towards – looking at why each element is essential, how business can move forward and what the Global Compact is doing to help. It aligns with most of the SDGs but primarily goal 8 on decent work and economic growth and goal 17 on partnership for the goals.
SDG Compass - The guide for business action on the SDGs
The SDG Compass guides companies on how they can align their strategies as well as measure and manage their contribution to the realization of the SDGs. The SDG Compass presents five steps that assist companies in maximizing their contribution to the SDGs: understanding the SDGs, defining priorities, goal setting, integrating sustainability and reporting.
An assessment tool to help implement the SDGs, looking how companies and civil society partners can work towards Goal 1 specifically
This report highlights how businesses have had a strong focus on advancing Goal 4, working with different stakeholders.
Linking to Goals Goal 2, 6, 12, 15, 17, these guidelines respond to the integrity challenges facing water stewardship initiatives (WSIs). Access quality management processes and a suite of practical tools via the questions and practical framework below in order to ensure high levels of integrity and transparency in your WSI.
This chapter supports Goal 2 (zero hunger) and Goal 17 (partnership for the goals) through its study of the role the private sector plays in agricultural development.
Elsevier, Global Environmental Change, Volume 28, September 01, 2014
This paper examines the development and use of scenarios as an approach to guide action in multi-level, multi-actor adaptation contexts such as food security under climate change. Three challenges are highlighted: (1) ensuring the appropriate scope for action; (2) moving beyond intervention-based decision guidance; and (3) developing long-term shared capacity for strategic planning. To overcome these challenges we have applied explorative scenarios and normative back-casting with stakeholders from different sectors at the regional level in East Africa.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 8, June 2014
Sub-Saharan Africa needs to produce more food, feed, and fiber to support its growing population and intensification of smallholder agriculture is a crucial component of any strategy towards this goal. Sustainable Intensification (SI) acknowledges that enhanced productivity needs to go hand in hand with the maintenance of other ecosystem services and enhanced resilience to shocks. A very diverse group of smallholders dominate SSA agriculture, with large heterogeneity in socio-technical conditions, famer typologies, production objectives, and the biophysical environment.
For economic development to succeed in Africa in the next 50. years, African agriculture will have to change beyond recognition. Production will have to have increased massively, but also labor productivity, requiring a vast reduction in the proportion of the population engaged in agriculture and a large move out of rural areas. The paper questions how this can be squared with a continuing commitment to smallholder agriculture as the main route for growth in African agriculture and for poverty reduction.

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