Water and sanitation

Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 467-474, ISSN 2210-6707

Water recycling schemes are a viable solution to limitations on water supply and yet public acceptance of these schemes is low. Advancing SDGs 6, 11 and 12, research was conducted in three metropolitan areas in the US to assess basic perceptions of treated wastewater occurrence and its acceptance in the public water supply. De facto reuse occurs at rates across the three cities higher than what is perceived. Roughly 25% of respondents perceive de facto reuse to occur in their home tap water. Respondents who perceived de facto reuse to occur at their tap were ten times more likely to have a high level of acceptance.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society,Volume 27, 2016,Pages 448-456,ISSN 2210-6707

Water reuse networks have been emerging globally for the last 50 years. This article furthers SDGS 6 and 11 by reviewing the economic, social and environmental issues related to implementing water reuse networks in cities, with a focus on London, UK.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Models of university-utility collaboration.
Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the SDG 6. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. The authors of this paper have developed a conceptual framework which can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH.
Loowatt team in Madagascar
The RELX Group Environmental Challenge is awarded annually to projects that best demonstrate how they can provide sustainable access to safe water where it is presently at risk and/or access to improved sanitation. The 2016 winner was Loowatt - an innovative sanitation solution which also generates power. The Environmental Challenge directly assists SDG 6.1 and 6.2 to achieve universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water and access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene, for all.
Elsevier,

Chem, Volume 1, Issue 1, 7 July 2016, Pages 10-12

Paul Anastas and Julie Zimmerman highlight the vital role chemistry must play in creating a sustainable future. The article provides a robust definition for green chemistry and examines the role of green chemistry in supporting the SDGs, with a particular focus on the goals addressing water, poverty and food: SDGs 1, 2, 6 and 12.
To advance Goal 6 and Goal 10, this webinar explores how businesses can responsibly manage the human rights impacts of their own water-intensive operations and/or supply chains
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 9, 2016, Pages 10-40

The aim of the study was to revise the current literature concerning the application of low-cost adsorbents for wastewater treatment highlighting, systematically, both adsorbents characteristics and adsorption capacities. This is particularly relevant to address SDG 6 - Clean water and sanitation.

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