Water and sanitation

Water and sanitation are pivotal elements of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), primarily encapsulated in SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation). This goal seeks to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all by 2030. This objective directly addresses the current global water crisis, where nearly 2.2 billion people live without access to safe water, and about 4.2 billion lack access to adequate sanitation.

By focusing on improving water quality, increasing water-use efficiency, implementing integrated water resources management at all levels, and protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems, SDG 6 addresses not only direct human needs but also the broader ecological health of the planet. Furthermore, efforts towards achieving SDG 6 indirectly promote several other SDGs.

For instance, water and sanitation are crucial to achieving SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), as clean water and proper sanitation facilities reduce the spread of water-borne diseases and significantly lower child and maternal mortality rates. Likewise, they are foundational to SDG 4 (Quality Education), given that the provision of water and sanitation facilities in schools significantly impacts the attendance and performance of students, particularly for girls.

SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) also intersects with water and sanitation, as sustainable and efficient water management is critical for agriculture, which remains the largest global water consumer. The necessity of water for food production and the potential impact of improved water management on crop yields and livestock health makes SDG 6 integral to achieving zero hunger.

SDG 6 contributes to SDG 1 (No Poverty) and SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) as well. Access to clean water and sanitation can enhance economic productivity by reducing time spent gathering water, reducing healthcare costs due to water-related diseases, and even creating jobs in water and sanitation services sectors.

In terms of environmental impact, the sustainable management of water resources is essential for SDG 13 (Climate Action), as water is a key factor in managing climate change due to its role in agriculture and energy production.

World Water Day is an annual celebration on 22 March. This year’s theme is about accelerating change to solve the water and sanitation crisis. To raise awareness for this important topic, Elsevier presents a curated list of publicly available journal articles and book chapters to help advance #SDG6 research.
This Article supports SDGs 3 and 6 by showing that the integration of a health education package for for the promotion of correct hygiene and sanitation practices into the school curriculum is an affordable and scalable approach to respond to the burden of soil-transmitted helminth infection among schoolchildren in the Philippines.
Elsevier,

Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C, Volume 129, 2023, 103358

The content concerns models for optimal utilization of groundwater resources
This Viewpoint supports SDGs 3 and 6, focusing on the rapid spread of Aedes and Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes and the associated transmission of disease, particularly in urban environments
This Article supports SDG 3s and 6 by presenting global comprehensive estimates of deaths associated with 33 bacterial pathogens across 11 major infectious syndromes, many of which could be prevented by improved access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities.
This study analyses spatial distribution of water reservoirs in the Sota catchment with regards to livestock density, population density, rainfall distribution and geological structure of the Sota catchment, and assessed the state of these reservoirs.
This study supports SDG's 9 and 13 through its discussion of the effects of optimizing Municipal Solid Waste management systems by increasing waste collection coverage and implementing diverse streams of waste valorization, causing a decrease of atmospheric pollution.
Studies on the distribution of microplastics in aquatic environments are summarized and environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting microplastic toxicity are reviewed
This study lookds at how climate change will have a significant impact on the availability of water resources in the upper Blue Nile basin of the Kiltie watershed
Results of ultrafiltration (UF) and reverse osmosis (RO) pilot plant on-site tests for wastewater reclamation are reported here with 90% and 65% water recovery achieved for UF and RO stages, respectively. RO achieved high quality requirements for industrial reuse supporting SDG 6.

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