The assessment of microbial functional diversity is an important indicator of soil quality.
Non-vascular plants such as mosses, lichens and especially microalgae are widespread in terrestrial ecosystems, but their contribution in the nutrient cycling and energy budget of soil food webs is ge
This book chapter addresses goals 15 and 17 by providing an overview of educational programming used across cheetah conservation organizations, including considerations for designing, implementing, and evaluating such programs for success.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 8, December 2017
From waste to wealth using green chemistry: The way to long term stability
Waste is an extremely valuable resource that we have been accumulating over a long period.
Multiple nutrient deficiencies related to severe soil fertility depletion have emerged as the major constraint to the sustainability of agriculture on a global scale.
Elsevier,

Social Ecology in the Digital Age, Solving Complex Problems in a Globalized World, 2018, Pages 223-264

This book chapter advances SDGs 13 and 15 by confronting what many scientists and policymakers regard as our gravest existential threats today—global climate change and its impacts on groundwater and food supplies, sea level rise and coastal flooding, ocean acidification extreme weather events, biodiversity loss, violent conflict over scarce resources, and disease pandemics.
This book chapter addresses goals 3, 12, and 15 by exploring how combining the knowledge derived from traditional medicinal practices with modern science creates endless possibilities for drug discovery and the use of plants in the treatment of a wide array of conditions.
Megacities contain at least 10 million people whose wellbeing largely depends on ecosystem services provided by remote natural areas.
Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles.
This book chapter advances SDGs 12 and 15 by explaining how humans have a detrimental impact on natural habitat due to various activities including deforestation, urbanization, roads, the energy sector (renewable and coal), mining, and climate change. The most important form of habitat destruction is deforestation either to develop land for agriculture (70%) or to harvest lumber intensively.

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