This Special Issue, bringing together articles from Science of the Total Environment; Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews; Ecological Modelling, and Resources; Conservation and Recycling, highlights the increasing understanding that major systems servicing human well-being, food, energy and water (FEW) systems are inextricably connected, and any attempt to address one dimension in isolation of the others will lead to unexpected, undesired, and far from optimal consequences. Considering these three systems holistically as the Food-Energy-Water Nexus directly considers Sustainable Development Goals 2 (zero hunger), 6 (clean water and sanitation), 7 (affordable and clean energy), 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure), and 12 (responsible consumption and production).
Contributing to SDGs 2 and 3, this chapter argues that the use of specific foods to sustain or enhance overall health and wellness requires understanding and regulation to ensure realistic and optimal results.
Advancing SDGs 2 and 15, this article explore the interactive effects of experimental soil warming and reduced earthworm densities on the abundance and diversity of soil organisms in a common barley agricultural system in the Hohenheim Climate Change Experiment (HoCC) in South West Germany.
At the 21st session of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC, COP21), a voluntary action plan, the ‘4 per 1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate’ was proposed under the Agenda for Action. The Initiative underlines the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in addressing the three-fold challenge of food and nutritional security, adaptation to climate change and mitigation of human-induced greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Advancing SDG 2, 13 and 15, this article explores the opportunities and challenges for the 4 per 1000 initiative.
The number of countries with a national development plan has more than doubled, from about 62 in 2006 to 134 in 2018. This paper analyses the resurgence of national development planning, identifies the types and content of the plans, and their implications and interactions with the SDGs and the global development agenda.
Elsevier,

Aging, Nutrition and Taste: Nutrition, Food Science and Culinary Perspectives for Aging Tastefully, 2019, Pages xi-xvi

The aging process changes the sensory sciences and can lead to malnutrition as eating becomes less pleasurable. This chapter explores how optimising food taste works toward ensuing ongoing good nutrition and health, contributing to SDGs 2 and 3.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 118, 2019, Pages 1-14, ISSN 0305-750X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2019.02.004.

The paper presents an integrated literature review organised around three disciplinary perspectives central to realizing SDG 2: ecology and agricultural sciences; nutrition and public health; and political economy and policy science. It argues that the pathway to achieving Zero Hunger should centre on place-based, adaptive and participatory solutions that simultaneously attend to local institutional capacities, agroecosystem diversification and ecological management, and the quality of local diets.
Elsevier,

Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 2, February 2019, Pages 154-166.

This research supports SDGs 2 (zero hunger), 15 (life on land) and 17 (partnerships for the goals). Ecological intensification aims to use ecosystem services (e.g. pollination and pest management) to sustain agricultural production while minimising environmental impact. Kleijn et al. discuss the benefits of ecological intensification and ways that scientists can better communicate these to farmers.
Elsevier,

Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 2, February 2019, Pages 132-138.

This article reflects on the ecological sustainability of insects as food, developing SDG 2 (zero hunger) and SDG 12 (responsible production and consumption). Sustainability of insects for food will be determined by a range of factors including the species reared, the type of feed used and management of waste.
Furthering SDGs 2 and 12, this report argues that feeding a population of 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy and sustainable diet will be impossible without transforming eating habits, improving food production and reducing food waste.

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