This paper uses a novel approach to re-examine the relationship between income inequality and pollution and shows that protecting the environment can have an added advantage of creating a just and inc
Elsevier,

One Earth, Volume 5, 20 May 2022

This article proposes a feasible framework to operate a global market of blue carbon, which helps to mitigate climate change.
Hand holding paper globe cutout
ISO 26000 provides social responsibility guidance to organisations around the world to assist them in contributing to global sustainable development. ISO 26000 contributes to every one of the 17 SDGs but is particularly influential to SDG 8, Decent Work and Economic Growth.
This chapters advances goals 5, 8, and 9 by covering the largely unpaid workload of women, especially rural women, which increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advances in Life Course Research, in press 2022, 100466

The effect of family on health.
International Women's day is celebrated every year on 8 March and this year's theme is “Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow”, recognizing the contribution of women and girls around the world, who are leading the charge on climate change adaptation, mitigation, and response, to build a more sustainable future for all. Elsevier has collated a freely available special issue of book chapters and journal articles to celebrate and highlight International Women's Day.
Elsevier,

Blood Advances, Volume 4, Issue 4, February 2020, Pages 755-761

Research looking into the disparities between male and female researchers in hematology
In December 2021 RELX held Responsible Supplier Sessions exploring themes including living wage, accessibility and modern slavery prevention. This information is particularly relevant to SDGs 8, 10 and 12.
This article examines the trade-offs between industrial development that benefits indigenous peoples economically and the environmental and other harms that result.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 90, 1 January 2022
Featuring original data, this article examines an elaborate network of gendered patterns in the faculty labor pool for the twenty-two English doctoral programs in Canada.

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