All-Energy Australia is where the country’s clean energy industry meets over two inspiring days to access the latest, cutting-edge information. All-Energy Australia combines a free-to-attend, business-to-business, world-class multi-stream conference with an unrivaled professional development and networking forum alongside a comprehensive exhibition. Clean energy professionals and end-users benefit from unique access to a showcase of innovations in renewable energy including sustainable transport, solar technology, energy storage, energy efficiency and future grid.
World Smart Energy Week is the world’s leading comprehensive B-to-B trade show for smart and renewable energy held twice a year in Japan. (March in Tokyo and September in Osaka) The show aims to provide a platform for professionals from across Japan, Asia, and the world to negotiate and network for the future of smart and renewable energy business. This supports SDG 9: to build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 13, 2017, Pages 18-23

In science and engineering, sustainable nanotechnology is successful in giving solutions for the challenges in various sectors such as medicine, catalysis, industrial and agricultural activities.Due to the growing demand of nanoparticles, it is essential to build up synthetic methods which are profitable, environmentally sustainable and which can substitute with effective and competent technology to synthesis environmentally benign nanoparticles (NPs). Nanomaterials are “deliberately engineered” to direct the enhancement of special properties at the nanoscale. Nanoparticles have been known to be used for abundant physical, biological, and pharmaceutical applications. Nano-silver is the most studied and utilized nanoparticle. This review presents various synthesis methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPAgNPs) and their application in different sectors.
Demise of correspondent banking relationships - SDG Resource Centre
Correspondent banking is the cornerstone of the global payment system, designed to serve the settlement of financial transactions across country borders. It allows companies and individuals to safely move money around the world and supports and encourages global trade. Since the financial crisis, tighter regulations - and in particular the regulatory penalties imposed for violations of anti-money laundering (AML) – have caused western banks to rethink their global strategy. The risks of doing business in many developing nations are beginning to be seen as outweighing the financial benefits brought by correspondent banking activity. As a result, US and European banks have reduced their correspondent banking activity in the riskiest regions.
SDG Business Forum
In July the 2017 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) Business Forum recognised the critical role of business in delivering on the promise of sustainable and inclusive development. In this article, we elaborate on the SDG business case, and how businesses can engage with the SDG framework; driving business growth and productivity, whilst contributing to the better world envisaged by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
Goal 5 target 5 is concerned with women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life. This study advances this target by studying gender diversity in medium to large organisations and asserts that diversity and equality management (DEM) systems are positively associated with performance and this relationship is moderated by lower to middle management gender diversity.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Energy Technologies and Assessments Volume 22, August 2017, Pages 92-105

This article provides a review on accessibility of energy and technologies to support health care facilities in the global south. It elaborates the criteria based on multi-disciplinary technology that address adaption of technology to suit the local community, social political factors and deployment of business model. Based on the technology assessment, a stable supply of energy in remote area to support health care facility needs is crucial. An onsite reliable energy system needs to be provided. It also summarises the assessment of the technologies for health care facilities. Efficient energy storage technologies are required in order to store electricity access during production peaks and provides electricity during production loss. The review supports SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy and SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure.
This overview provides guidance on the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility as understood under UK law, including the institutional framework for sustainable development. This guidance is relevant to all SDGs and in particular to SDGs 9, 11, and 12.
The Consolidated Versions of the Treaty on European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Eu-ropean Union (the EU Treaties) set out the constitutional framework for the EU. The Treaties do not attempt to define sustainable development or impose an EU-wide adoption of a common definition. This practice note sets out the approach to sustainable development at the EU institutional level. This has an impact on all SDGs but in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.
UK mechanisms touching on sustainable development are generally based on, and have as their over-arching objective, some variation of the so-called “Brundtland definition”. These mechanisms also widely reference the three interconnected ‘pillars’ of sustainable development, also known as the ‘triple bottom line’ of sustainable development. The UK approach has a bearing on all SDGs and in particular, SDGs 9, 10 and 13.

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