This book chapter addresses SDG 9 and 17 by explaining the evolution of the blue economy. From the moment it moved offshore, the oil and gas industry had a requirement for the skills of geotechnical engineers, geoscientists, meteorologists, and oceanographers to ensure that activities were conducted efficiently and safely, and a core element of the new blue economy was created. The migration into deeper water created new challenges, and the industry invests heavily in scientific studies, and research and development, to overcome them. In many cases, oil and gas companies form consortiums that support collaborative research conducted jointly by academic and industry scientists. As the level of engagement with the ocean observing community has grown, the industry has released much of its data into the public domain and supported the development of appropriate degrees and training to ensure that the new blue economy has a capable workforce. As the balance of energy moves away from hydrocarbons to renewable energy sources, and new industries emerge such as deep-sea mining, requiring the services of ocean scientists, the new blue economy created by the oil and gas industry will be well equipped to serve their needs.
Elsevier,

Environmental Systems Science, Theory and Practical Applications, 2021, Pages 509-542

This book chapter advances SDGs 9, 13, and 15 by introducing techniques for assessing economics and feasibility to complement the technical and scientific rigor in environmental systems science. This includes attention to project planning and communicating decisions and working with stakeholders and emission reduction and prevention strategies, including fuel-related and air toxics strategies.
Elsevier, One Earth, Volume 4, 21 May 2021
Globally, financial services are well positioned to contribute to the transformation needed for sustainable futures and will be critical for supporting corporate activities that regenerate and promote
Elsevier,

Climate Change Science, Causes, Effects and Solutions for Global Warming, 2021, Pages 223-246

This book chapter advances SDGs 9 and 13 by discussing how designing smart building technology to satisfy the net energy and water needs of a building provides an innovative technology for mitigating global energy, environmental, and climate vulnerability.
Elsevier,

Earthquakes and Sustainable Infrastructure, Neodeterministic (NDSHA) Approach Guarantees Prevention Rather Than Cure, 2022, Pages 77-95

This book chapter addresses SDGs 9 and 11 by explaining how prediction and prevention of earthquake-related disasters are key to creating sustainable cities.
Objectives: In the face of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, people with dementia and their carers are contending with serious challenges to their health and wellbeing, due to risk of severe illness, limiting
Introduction: Growing demand for mental health services, coupled with funding and resource limitations, creates an opportunity for novel technological solutions including artificial intelligence (AI).
Elsevier,

Hybrid Energy Systems for Offshore Applications, Hybrid Energy Systems, 2021, Pages 7-18

This book chapter addresses SDG 7 and 9 by explaining the offshore alternative energy options for power production including solutions on synergy between offshore oil and gas production and offshore wind, lending to hybrid energy systems.
The aim of the March Kennesaw State University College of Computing and Software Engineering Hackathon event, was to demonstrate to students how big data analytics may be used for social good to solve problems in society that make a real difference in people's lives. HPCC Systems provided students with the opportunity to learn more about The ADAM Program and take a look at missing children trends.

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