Science

The role of science in achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) cannot be overstated. Science, technology, and innovation are instrumental to addressing the significant challenges encompassed within the 17 SDGs, ranging from poverty and inequality to climate change and biodiversity loss.

Science underpins our understanding of the challenges our world faces and is pivotal in SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and 15 (Life on Land), where understanding ecosystems, environmental degradation, and climate change is paramount. Research in the Earth and environmental sciences provides us with knowledge about the severity of these issues and potential mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Furthermore, in SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), science in the form of medical research and biotechnology contributes to the development of treatments and preventive measures for various diseases. Vaccines, therapeutic drugs, and disease prevention techniques have been made possible due to advancements in biological and health sciences.

Moreover, technological advancements and innovative solutions, often rooted in science, are essential to achieving SDG 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation), and SDG 9 (Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure). From developing renewable energy technologies to creating systems that enhance water and sanitation accessibility, science serves as the bedrock of these innovations.

Science also plays a critical role in SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) by improving agricultural methods, crop yields, and food storage. Through genetic engineering and modern farming techniques, scientists can help increase food security and reduce world hunger.

Finally, science is integral to SDG 4 (Quality Education). A well-rounded education should include a robust scientific curriculum that fosters critical thinking, problem-solving, and a deep understanding of the world. Furthermore, by promoting scientific literacy, societies are better equipped to make informed decisions about policies and practices that affect sustainable development.

To make strides in achieving the SDGs, the scientific community, policymakers, and society must work together. The integration of science into policy-making processes is fundamental in developing and implementing sustainable and impactful strategies that move us closer to accomplishing these ambitious yet achievable goals.

In 2014, University College London and Elsevier established the UCL Big Data Institute, a collaboration to empower researchers to explore innovative ways to apply new technologies and analytics to scholarly content and data. The institute is co-staffed with UCL and Elsevier researchers and is based at Elsevier’s London Mendeleys headquarters. Projects include investigation of the role and impact of researchers in academic networks, citation models, adaptive user modeling, knowledge graphs and predictive modeling.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 691-699

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14 and 15 by discussing how global declines of amphibians refer to the phenomenon of the population declines and even extinctions of amphibian species around the world.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 681-707

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14, and 15 by discussing the biodiversity of mammals, covering all ranges from a shrew to the blue whale.
Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab in diabetic macular edema (DME) patients. Design: Two parallel, methodologically identical, phase III, multicenter, double-masked, sham injectioncontrolled, randomized studies. Participants: Adults with vision loss from DME (best-corrected visual acuity [BCVA], 20/4020/320 Snellen equivalent) and central subfield thickness ≥275 μm on time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Intervention: Monthly intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 or 0.3 mg) or sham injections. Macular laser was available per-protocolspecified criteria.
Elsevier, Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Volume 24, August 2009
Same-sex sexual behavior has been extensively documented in non-human animals. Here we review the contexts in which it has been studied, focusing on case studies that have tested both adaptive and non-adaptive explanations for the persistence of same-sex sexual behavior. Researchers have begun to make headway unraveling possible evolutionary origins of these behaviors and reasons for their maintenance in populations, and we advocate expanding these approaches to examine their role as agents of evolutionary change.
Elsevier,

Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Volume 35, August 2008

Shows biosynthetic pathways from Tryptophan to Serotonin and from Tyrosine to Epinephrine
Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas are rare tumors; most are sporadic.

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