Sustainable cities and human settlements

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11 aims to "Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable." This goal acknowledges the growing importance of urban areas, as it's projected that by 2050, nearly 70% of the world's population will live in cities. Consequently, cities bear significant implications for sustainability, economic growth, and societal wellbeing.

Inclusivity is a key feature of sustainable cities. This refers to equitable access to opportunities, public services, and amenities, regardless of a person's background or circumstances. It implies the availability of affordable and adequate housing, thus addressing issues of homelessness and substandard living conditions.

Safety in cities means ensuring urban environments that protect their inhabitants from both physical harm and psychological distress. This involves addressing crime rates, traffic accidents, and potential hazards from poor infrastructure, while also considering the impacts of noise, pollution, and overcrowdedness on mental health.

Resilience is another important aspect, particularly in the face of climate change. Resilient cities can withstand and quickly recover from shocks such as natural disasters or economic crises. This involves aspects such as resilient infrastructure, disaster risk reduction strategies, and adaptive capacities at the community level.

Sustainability, finally, requires cities to function in a way that doesn't compromise future generations' ability to meet their own needs. This includes sustainable urban planning to reduce environmental impact, promote energy efficiency, and conserve resources. It also considers the importance of green spaces for biodiversity and the wellbeing of urban residents.

SDG 11 is interconnected with many other SDGs. For example, sustainable urban transport systems contribute to SDG 13 (Climate Action) by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Meanwhile, ensuring access to green and public spaces supports SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being).

Achieving sustainable cities and human settlements requires cooperation and participation from various stakeholders, including government authorities, urban planners, businesses, and citizens. Through their collective efforts, cities can be transformed into hubs of sustainability, resilience, and inclusivity, contributing significantly towards the realization of the SDGs.

Elsevier,

Artificial Intelligence in Urban Planning and Design, Technologies, Implementation, and Impacts, 2022, Pages 121-138

This chapter advances the UN SDG Goal 3: Good Health by providing an overview of research on the use of image data of the built environment to analyze impacts on human health and explaining the challenges that need to be addressed to realize a new data-driven era of urban analysis and planning.
Examination of the life-centred design approach, which provides a more holistic perspective to the production of interactive products by decentring humans. Article puts forward a practical framework for life-centred design, allowing for environmental and ethical concerns to be highlighted.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Energy Transition for Cities, 2022, Pages 19-29

This book chapter advances SDGs 13, 7, and 11 by explaining how to promote the transition toward future cities models based on efficient resource consumption and effective implementation of neutral circular economy urban strategies.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Energy Transition for Cities, 2022, Pages 141-194

This book chapter advances SDGs 13, 7, and 11 by presenting a set of parameters, operational strategies, and guidelines for a Net-Zero Energy City.
Elsevier,

Miguel Amado, Francesca Poggi, Chapter 1 - Cities Evolution, Editor(s): Miguel Amado, Francesca Poggi, Sustainable Energy Transition for Cities, Elsevier, 2022, Pages 1-17, ISBN 9780128242773, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-824277-3.00002-5. 

This chapter advances UN SDG goals 11, 13, and 7 by discussing the Smart City potential for contributing to the reduction of external dependence on fossil fuels and the promotion of renewable energy sources and the mitigation of environmental impacts and effects of climate change.

On April 22 every year, we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement with Earth Day. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, this day has marked global collaboration and awareness of the need to fight for a cleaner and healthier Earth. It all began in 1962 when Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring hit the New York’s bestseller list selling over 500,000 copies in 24 countries.

This Special Issue highlights publicly available journal articles and book chapters focusing on various humanitarian issues related to the crisis in the Ukraine and other countries.
Elsevier,

Indigenous People and Nature, Insights for Social, Ecological, and Technological Sustainability, 2022, Pages 171-197

Understanding livelihood vulnerability to hydrometeorological hazards is a crucial challenge for policymakers to create a clear foundation for vulnerable coastal residents. Using microlevel livelihood vulnerability research employing LVI and Socioeconomic Vulnerability Index, this chapter measures the magnitude of indigenous peoples' vulnerability to the detrimental consequences of hydrometeorological hazards on socioeconomic conditions.
Elsevier,

Indigenous People and Nature, Insights for Social, Ecological, and Technological Sustainability, 2022, Pages 3-27

This chapter provides a comprehensive strategy to assess ecological systems’ involvement in indigenous wellbeing, signifying how natural systems are intertwined with people’s communal, economic, and cultural environments, along with their skills.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Volume 13, March 2022
Telecommuting has become a dominant professional experience for many Canadian business and workers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Telecommuting has several benefits that are separate from COVID-19. Two prevalent changes have been in regard to telecommuting and online food buying habits, both of which impact social wellbeing as a dimension of social sustainability. We discuss two exploratory surveys on the perception of telecommuting and food e-commerce.

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