Diversity and inclusion

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the professional and personal lives of radiologists and radiation oncologists. This article summarizes the 2020 American Association for Women in Radiology (AAWR) Women's Caucus at the American College of Radiology (ACR) Annual Meeting. The caucus focused on the major challenges that women in radiology have faced during the pandemic.
Managerial oversight is strengthened and firms' strategic performance improved when boards are gender-diverse. Yet the rate of women's appointment to corporate boards is decelerating. This study proposes an explanation for the unexpected attenuation rooted in social movement dynamics, particularly cross-movement influences originating from the contemporary governance reform movement. Seeking to alleviate managerialist tendencies, the governance reform movement has compelled major changes to board structure, composition, and activity, as well as the broader logic surrounding corporate boards.
Background: Patients from ethnic minority groups are disproportionately affected by Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the relationship between ethnicity and clinical outcomes in COVID-19. Methods: Databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PROSPERO, Cochrane library and MedRxiv) were searched up to 31st August 2020, for studies reporting COVID-19 data disaggregated by ethnicity. Outcomes were: risk of infection; intensive therapy unit (ITU) admission and death. PROSPERO ID: 180654.
This chapter addresses SDG 10 and SDG 3 through an examination the critical dimensions of cyberbullying in relation to hate speech and online harassment, connecting it with racial and ethnic discrimination.
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of gender disparities in academic radiation oncology departments in the United States and the associated factors. Methods and Materials: The data were collected from publicly available resources, including websites of individual radiation oncology programs, the Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and the Association of American Medical Colleges.
Elsevier, International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Volume 108, 15 November 2020
Purpose: Black physicians remain disproportionately underrepresented in certain medical specialties, yet comprehensive assessments in radiation oncology (RO) are lacking. Our purpose was to report current and historical representation trends for Black physicians in the US RO workforce. Methods and Materials: Public registries were used to assess significant differences in 2016 representation for US vs RO Black academic full-time faculty, residents, and applicants. Historical changes from 1970 to 2016 were reported descriptively.
Elsevier, Forensic Science International: Mind and Law, Volume 1, November 2020
Elsevier, Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Volume 8, November 2020
Diagram illustrating the coding process employed in this research. Index and analytic codes are bolded and enclosed in rectangular borders. Adjacent codes are co-occurring, or assigned to the same excerpt.
People with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable to the direct health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the wider impacts of the pandemic response. People with disabilities experience numerous barriers to using transportation to access essential goods, like fresh food, and services, like medical care, that are necessary for maintaining health. The pandemic and the pandemic response threaten to exacerbate persistent health disparities and add to transportation barriers that disadvantage people with disabilities.

December 3rd is the International Day of People With Disabilities (IDPWD). In support of this year's theme - 'Not all Disabilities are Visible' - Elsevier presents presents a curated, open access collection of over 50 journal articles and book chapters focused on spreading awareness and understanding of disabilities, many of which are not immediately apparent. This includes mental illness, chronic pain or fatigue, brain injuries, neurological disorders, learning differences and cognitive dysfunctions, among others. 

This chapter sets out to identify key dimensions of oppression and allyship in nursing, where nurses coming from dominant or privileged groups take action to reject and dismantle conditions of oppression.

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