Diversity and inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are essential tenets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives designed to address various social, economic, and environmental challenges. These concepts are not only integral to specific SDGs but also permeate the entire framework, emphasizing the need for equitable and inclusive approaches in all aspects of development.

SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality) are directly connected to the principles of diversity and inclusion. SDG 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. This involves taking measures to ensure the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, regardless of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. It calls for the elimination of discriminatory laws, policies, and practices, providing equal opportunities and reducing disparities, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SDG 5 focuses on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. This goal underscores the need for ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, and it involves various targets including the elimination of violence, ensuring women's full participation in leadership and decision-making, and guaranteeing equal rights to economic resources. By promoting gender equality, SDG 5 directly contributes to the broader objective of creating inclusive societies.

Furthermore, diversity and inclusion are crucial in achieving SDG 4 (Quality Education), which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This involves addressing disparities in access to education and ensuring that vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations, receive equal opportunities for education. Inclusive education is a foundation for building more inclusive societies, as it prepares all individuals to participate fully in their communities and economies.

SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) also embodies the values of diversity and inclusion. It promotes sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. This includes advocating for equal pay for work of equal value, promoting safe and inclusive working environments, and reducing the gender pay gap. By ensuring that all individuals have access to decent work opportunities and are treated fairly in the workplace, SDG 8 plays a pivotal role in advancing inclusive economic growth.

The pursuit of diversity and inclusion is indispensable for realizing the vision of the SDGs. These principles are not confined to specific goals but are woven throughout the entire framework, reflecting the understanding that a fair, sustainable, and prosperous world can only be achieved when all individuals, regardless of their background or circumstances, have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from development. The SDGs recognize that addressing inequalities, empowering marginalized groups, and ensuring inclusive participation are essential for sustainable development, and they call on all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, civil society, and individuals, to work towards these objectives.

Elsevier, Journal of Transport and Health, Volume 24, March 2022
Introduction: Limited research has explored the influence of commuting on expectant mother's health and well-being and how expectant mothers can be supported during their commute. The present study aimed to identify the impact of commuting during pregnancy on women's physical and mental health. Further, the effectiveness of Transport for London's baby-on-board badge was explored. Method: This was a mixed-method study. An online survey of 295 participants over the age of 18 years was conducted to explore their views on commuting and the effectiveness of the baby-on-board badge.
Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.

Objectives: To synthesize literature about teaching social justice to nursing students and identify approaches for effective teaching of social justice issues in nursing education. Design: An integrative review. Data sources: Literature was searched in CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and OVID databases. In total, 32 articles were assessed for full-text eligibility, and 18 articles published from January 2011 until August 2021 were critically appraised and reviewed. Review methods: Articles were appraised using Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool.

Introduction: Robust occupant protection is critical for the longevity and quality of life of the diverse driving population. Studies have shown that the vehicle crash testing process has greatly assisted in decreasing the severity of injuries experienced by occupants. However, female occupants are not equitably accounted for in the current testing processes while experiencing a significantly increased risk of higher severity injuries compared to male occupants in comparable crash conditions.

This Viewpoint supports SDGs 3 and 10 by arguing that greater attention and emphasis should be placed on children with developmental disabilities in early childhood development strategies, which would necessitate funding and investment specifically for this patient population.
Average age at death is younger for intellectual and developmental disabled adults. This disparity is more pronounced among all racial-ethnic minorities. Racial-ethnic inequities are most severe among adults with cerebral palsy.
Do immigrants suffer extra mental health problems? Is there a way to improve the mental health of first and second generation immigrants?
International Women's day is celebrated every year on 8 March and this year's theme is “Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow”, recognizing the contribution of women and girls around the world, who are leading the charge on climate change adaptation, mitigation, and response, to build a more sustainable future for all. Elsevier has collated a freely available special issue of book chapters and journal articles to celebrate and highlight International Women's Day.
Background: Among patients with type 2 diabetes, minority racial/ethnic groups have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and hypoglycaemia. These groups may especially benefit from newer diabetes medication classes, but high cost may limit access. We examined the association of race/ethnicity with the initiation of newer diabetes medications (GLP-1 receptor agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors).
Background: In response to a national call for re-evaluation of the use of race in clinical algorithms, the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) and the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) established a Task Force to reassess inclusion of race in the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the United States and its implications for diagnosis and management of patients with, or at risk for, kidney diseases.

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