Diversity and inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are essential tenets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives designed to address various social, economic, and environmental challenges. These concepts are not only integral to specific SDGs but also permeate the entire framework, emphasizing the need for equitable and inclusive approaches in all aspects of development.

SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality) are directly connected to the principles of diversity and inclusion. SDG 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. This involves taking measures to ensure the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, regardless of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. It calls for the elimination of discriminatory laws, policies, and practices, providing equal opportunities and reducing disparities, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SDG 5 focuses on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. This goal underscores the need for ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, and it involves various targets including the elimination of violence, ensuring women's full participation in leadership and decision-making, and guaranteeing equal rights to economic resources. By promoting gender equality, SDG 5 directly contributes to the broader objective of creating inclusive societies.

Furthermore, diversity and inclusion are crucial in achieving SDG 4 (Quality Education), which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This involves addressing disparities in access to education and ensuring that vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations, receive equal opportunities for education. Inclusive education is a foundation for building more inclusive societies, as it prepares all individuals to participate fully in their communities and economies.

SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) also embodies the values of diversity and inclusion. It promotes sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. This includes advocating for equal pay for work of equal value, promoting safe and inclusive working environments, and reducing the gender pay gap. By ensuring that all individuals have access to decent work opportunities and are treated fairly in the workplace, SDG 8 plays a pivotal role in advancing inclusive economic growth.

The pursuit of diversity and inclusion is indispensable for realizing the vision of the SDGs. These principles are not confined to specific goals but are woven throughout the entire framework, reflecting the understanding that a fair, sustainable, and prosperous world can only be achieved when all individuals, regardless of their background or circumstances, have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from development. The SDGs recognize that addressing inequalities, empowering marginalized groups, and ensuring inclusive participation are essential for sustainable development, and they call on all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, civil society, and individuals, to work towards these objectives.

This chapters advances goals 5, 8, and 9 by covering the largely unpaid workload of women, especially rural women, which increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.
This Viewpoint supports SDGs 3 and 16 by highlighting how mass incarceration contributes to structural racism and discussing how this exacerbates health inequalities. The authors focus on the COVID-19 pandemic as an example.
Although changes in socio-cultural positions appear to take place shortly after arrival, there is a growing concern on socio-cultural differences in receiving societies and it is widely recognized that socio-cultural positions are important for further participation and well-being, few scholars examined socio-cultural positions among recently arrived refugees in Europe. At the same time, not much is known about how these positions relate to pre-migration, migration and post-migration characteristics, while these could be key indicators of early acculturation.
For International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 2022, Márcia Balisciano, Global Head of Corporate Responsibility at RELX speaks to Jean Chawapiwa and Sara Bodison about the importance of developing diverse supply chains.
The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is celebrated every year on March 21st. Elsevier has selected and curated a number of journal articles and book chapters in a dedicated Special issue to highlight this important theme. These articles are freely available to read and share. #fightracism #Standup4humanrights
An analysis of ethnic inequalities in reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health interventions in Ecuador, in the context of SDG 3 and 10, showing that Indigenous people are most likely to face difficulty accessing such services.
An Article examining ethnic inequalities in stroke care in New Zealand, in the context of SDG 3 and 10, with the results showing poorer access to stroke interventions among Māori communities.
Elsevier, Journal of Transport and Health, Volume 24, March 2022
Introduction: Limited research has explored the influence of commuting on expectant mother's health and well-being and how expectant mothers can be supported during their commute. The present study aimed to identify the impact of commuting during pregnancy on women's physical and mental health. Further, the effectiveness of Transport for London's baby-on-board badge was explored. Method: This was a mixed-method study. An online survey of 295 participants over the age of 18 years was conducted to explore their views on commuting and the effectiveness of the baby-on-board badge.
Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.

Introduction: Robust occupant protection is critical for the longevity and quality of life of the diverse driving population. Studies have shown that the vehicle crash testing process has greatly assisted in decreasing the severity of injuries experienced by occupants. However, female occupants are not equitably accounted for in the current testing processes while experiencing a significantly increased risk of higher severity injuries compared to male occupants in comparable crash conditions.

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