Diversity and inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are essential tenets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives designed to address various social, economic, and environmental challenges. These concepts are not only integral to specific SDGs but also permeate the entire framework, emphasizing the need for equitable and inclusive approaches in all aspects of development.

SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality) are directly connected to the principles of diversity and inclusion. SDG 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. This involves taking measures to ensure the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, regardless of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. It calls for the elimination of discriminatory laws, policies, and practices, providing equal opportunities and reducing disparities, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SDG 5 focuses on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. This goal underscores the need for ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, and it involves various targets including the elimination of violence, ensuring women's full participation in leadership and decision-making, and guaranteeing equal rights to economic resources. By promoting gender equality, SDG 5 directly contributes to the broader objective of creating inclusive societies.

Furthermore, diversity and inclusion are crucial in achieving SDG 4 (Quality Education), which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This involves addressing disparities in access to education and ensuring that vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations, receive equal opportunities for education. Inclusive education is a foundation for building more inclusive societies, as it prepares all individuals to participate fully in their communities and economies.

SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) also embodies the values of diversity and inclusion. It promotes sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. This includes advocating for equal pay for work of equal value, promoting safe and inclusive working environments, and reducing the gender pay gap. By ensuring that all individuals have access to decent work opportunities and are treated fairly in the workplace, SDG 8 plays a pivotal role in advancing inclusive economic growth.

The pursuit of diversity and inclusion is indispensable for realizing the vision of the SDGs. These principles are not confined to specific goals but are woven throughout the entire framework, reflecting the understanding that a fair, sustainable, and prosperous world can only be achieved when all individuals, regardless of their background or circumstances, have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from development. The SDGs recognize that addressing inequalities, empowering marginalized groups, and ensuring inclusive participation are essential for sustainable development, and they call on all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, civil society, and individuals, to work towards these objectives.

Historical and Continued Colonial Impacts on Heart Health of Indigenous Peoples
Colonization and enforced genocidal strategies have collectively fractured and changed Indigenous people by attempting to erase and dismiss their voices and knowledge. Nearly a decade ago, we were reminded by Dr Ku Young of the cardiovascular health disparities, in evidence among Indigenous people in Canada. compared with White people. He went on to say that beyond a biomedical understanding of this health status is the ongoing impact of long-standing marginalization and oppression faced by Indigenous people.
This Comment article supports SDGs 3 and 10; Muneera Rasheed presents some guidelines for decolonisation in global health research, highlighting the need to challenge current systems to fight power asymmetries in the context of academic research partnerships between high-income and low-income countries and other behaviours that undermine equitable collaboration.
An Editorial on the burden of HIV on marginalised communities across the Americas, in the context of SDGs 3 and 10, focusing specifically on the need to improve access to and quality of treatment and care for these populations, which include Indigenous peoples.
Elsevier, Journal of Aging Studies, Volume 59, December 2021
Dance for Parkinson's can be characterised as a growing social movement which has become a worldwide phenomenon that gives rise to new questions about the meaning and importance of dance in relation to intersecting and overlapping identity categories of ageing and chronic conditions. In this article, we probe into the potentially constructive interplay between the lived experiences of Parkinson's dance as a space of revitalised sensuality and the cultural imaginations and values connected to the nexus between ageing and chronic conditions.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Volume 154, December 2021
Mobility is a critical element of one's quality of life regardless of one's age. Although the challenges for women are more significant than those for men as they age, far less is known about the gender differences in mobility patterns of older adults, especially in the United States (US) context. This paper reports on a study that examined potential gender gaps in mobility patterns of older adults (aged 65 years and over) in the US by analyzing data from the 2017 National Household Travel Survey.
Elsevier, The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 21, December 2021
Research suggests that racial/ethnic disparities in COVID-19 in the US are largely driven by higher rates of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 among Hispanic/Latino and Black populations. Occupational exposures play a large role in structuring risk of exposure, and essential workers are at elevated risk of COVID-19 infection. At a national-level, workers categorized as “essential” and “high-risk” are disproportionately Hispanic/Latino, but we lack analysis examining local-level racial/ethnic disparities in potential occupational exposures.
Elsevier,

Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, Volume 90, December 2021

It has now been more than thirty years since Joan Wallach Scott (1986) argued that gender is a legitimate and necessary category of historical analysis that applies to all fields, including genetics. In the intervening years, a substantial body of work has appeared that adds women to the historiography of genetics. While this is a necessary component for including gender as a category of analysis in genetics, it is not sufficient.

Relative number of participants with a diagnosis of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) in studies that assessed its association with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
In studies of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, white women are overrepresented. There is limited and heterogeneous reporting of race and ethnicity information across studies and few include race and/or ethnicity variables in statistical analysis.
For International Day of Persons with Disabilities 2021, Stacy Masucci, publisher for bioscience and translational medicine at Elsevier speaks to Richard Mankin and Kate Nash about the challenges, barriers and opportunities for people who live with disabilities in the context of the global pandemic.

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