The number of countries with a national development plan has more than doubled, from about 62 in 2006 to 134 in 2018. This paper analyses the resurgence of national development planning, identifies the types and content of the plans, and their implications and interactions with the SDGs and the global development agenda.
In 2017, the UN adopted a global SDG indicator framework, calling for complementary national and regional indicators to be collected by member countries, while the UN Habitat developed an indicator action framework specifically for cities. This paper examined the extent to which using UN Sustainable Development Goal indicators framework will help cities evaluate their efforts to deliver sustainability and health outcomes. It identified inconsistencies between the two two frameworks. Many of the SDG indicators assessed outcomes, rather than the ‘upstream’ policies and interventions required to deliver outcomes on-the-ground. Conversely, the UN Habitat framework incorporated intervention indicators, but excluded health outcome indicators. We proposed a more comprehensive approach to benchmarking, monitoring and evaluating policies designed to achieve healthy and sustainable cities and assessing spatial inequities.
Infrastructure is a global multi-trillion dollar market presenting many opportunities and risks for sustainable development. This article aims to foster better conceptualisation of the connections and tensions between infrastructure policy and public health in the light of the Sustainable Development Goals, especially ‘good health and wellbeing’ (number 3) and ‘industry, innovation and infrastructure’ (number 9), based on findings from interviews with a purposive sample of senior practicing Australian infrastructure policy makers.
Elsevier,

Marine Pollution Bulletin, Volume 136, Nov 2018, Pages 508-515.

This content contributes to SDG 13 (climate action), SDG 14 (life below water) and SDG 17 (partnerships for the goals).This article discusses the importance of combined biophysical and socio-economic sciences sharing knowledge with management communities, improving coral reef resilience in the face of global climate and ocean change.
Exploring SDG 17 (partnerships for the goals), this article conceptualises the intricate interconnections between SDG 14 (life below water) and the other Sustainable Development Goals based on the diverse benefits provided to humankind by marine ecosystems.
This framework illustrates how SDG 14 (life below water) targets can relate to all other SDG goals, contributing to SDG 17 (partnership for the goals). A framework is presented to increase understanding of relationships between Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to determine their interactions, aiding the effective and efficient prioritisation of policy options.
The SDGs are all connected. Success in one goal often relies on success in another. The science supporting the SDGs needs to reflect these connections, which is what the Perspectives Project aims to achieve: enabling collaboration between experts from all over the world. The project addresses a core question: how is the SDG agenda influencing scholarly debates in different research areas, and vice-versa? The reviews will cover the breadth of the SDGs and will be published as part of three special issues in three key journals.
Elsevier,

World Development, Volume 101, January 2018, Pages 173-187

The Green Climate Fund (GCF) was set up in 2009 to help developing countries address climate change, however, it is confronted with the problem of insufficient financing. SDG 17 focuses on partnerships for the goals, which includes official development assistance. This paper explores several schemes for raising the public finance of the GCF among developed countries and therefore contributes to both goal 17 and 13.
This book chapter addresses goals 15 and 17 by providing an overview of educational programming used across cheetah conservation organizations, including considerations for designing, implementing, and evaluating such programs for success.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 8, 2017

From waste to wealth using green chemistry: The way to long term stability
This paper provides an overview on societal challenges and opportunities associated with waste valorization strategies, contributing to SDG 12. Moving away from the linear economy model, waste becomes a resource rather than a burden for the society. Focusing on two specific waste streams – namely plastics and food supply chain wastes – it explores a circular economy model. Bearing in mind that waste is a resource, initiatives all over the world should not only target minimizing or totally stopping land-filling but also reducing existing land-fills through landfill mining. In accordance with SDG 17, Clark suggests a three-way partnership between industry, government and the public – where each actor plays a specific role in promoting new technologies, developing supportive regulations and embracing a new consumption attitude towards waste.

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