Global

This report provides an overview on how to do business with respect to children's right to be free from child labour, with the aim to improve global supply chain governance, due diligence and remediation processes to advance the progressive elimination of child labour. This report relates to Goal 8 and Goal 10.
Linking to Goal 10 and Goal 16, this report outlines ways in which business can help uphold children’s rights and support and promote their well-being during humanitarian crises.
Linking to Goal 10, this webinar explains the importance of integrating human rights considerations into Mergers & Acquisitions processes and provides guidance on how companies can do so.
Linking to Goal 10, this infographic highlights the human rights dimension of each Sustainable Development Goal, by indicating the relevant international human rights instrument that applies.
Linking Goal 10 and Goal 16, this report highlights the linkages between human rights and anti-corruption compliance and how companies can benefit from integrating these considerations in their compliance programs.
This report examines the real estate sector’s impact in relation to the UN Global Compact’s four focus areas of human rights, labour standards, the environment and anti-corruption, relating to Goal 9 and Goal 17.
A responsible supply chain, and eliminating corruption in the supply chain, are important elements of goals 10 and 16. This report, updated in 2016, outlines common supply chain corruption scenarios and provides a framework and set of tools for addressing them.
Background: The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution.
Men are more likely than women to perpetrate nearly all types of interpersonal violence (e.g. intimate partner violence, murder, assault, rape). While public health programs target prevention efforts for each type of violence, there are rarely efforts that approach the prevention of violence holistically and attempt to tackle its common root causes. Drawing upon theories that explain the drivers of violence, we examine how gender norms, including norms and social constructions of masculinity, are at the root of most physical violence perpetration by men against women and against other men.

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