Towards Sustainable Cities and Society: Addressing the Water Security Challenge

 Towards Sustainable Cities and Society: Addressing the Water Security Challenge
Elsevier, Sustainable Cities and Society

This special issues addresses the water security challenges critical to achieve sustainable cities and therefore advancing SDG 6 clean water and sanitation and SDG 11.

Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 29, February 2017, Pages 23-40

Effective communication to citizens is of prime importance during public health crises involving water. This paper takes a sequential mixed method approach to the problem of communicating drinking water risks prevention of exposure to health risks in cities, related to SDG 6: clean water and sanitation.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 29, February 2017, Pages 247-256

The expansion and operation of water supply systems under growing demands, hydrologic variability, and water scarcity requires strategic decisions on supply sources for reducing and improving reliability and flexibility. This paper provides an integrated framework to optimize water supply system expansions using dynamic programming and combining short and long term water supply source optimization using quadratic programming. This relates to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 435-449, ISSN 2210-6707,

Cities are strongly dependent on infrastructures providing essential services, namely Lifeline Systems (LS) that support societal functions, safety, economic prosperity and quality of life. The operation of LS in ordinary conditions as well as after disasters is crucial. The main aim of the paper is to define a System Dynamic Model (SDM) to assess the evolution of resilience of a drinking water supply system in case of natural disasters, with particular attention to the role of both ‘structural’ and ‘non-structural’ parameters drawing on the L’Aquila (Italy) earthquake as a case study.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, January 2017, Pages 420-434

An agent-based model is created using data for household characteristics and outdoor water use to calculate water demands. This model represents utility response to water shortages to enact residential restrictions. The agent-based model is coupled with reservoir simulation for a case study, and results are compared to historic data. Sustainability of water policies is evaluated for climate scenarios created using a stochastic reconstruction framework. This is related to SDG 6.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, January 2017, Pages 287-296

Urban source separation infrastructure systems have a promising potential for a more sustainable management of household food waste and wastewaters. A renewed trend of larger implementations of pilot areas with such systems is currently emerging in Northern Europe. This study investigates the drivers behind the decision of stakeholders to implement source separation systems as well as the importance of the previously existing pilot areas in the decision-making process.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 450-452

This paper discusses the CO2 footprint of California’s drought during 2012–2014. The authors show that California drought significantly increased CO2 emissions of the energy sector by around 22 million metric tons, indicating 33% increase in the annual CO2 emissions compared to pre-drought conditions. They argue that CO2 emission of climate extremes deserve more attention, because their cumulative impacts on CO2 emissions are staggering. Most countries, including the United States, do not have a comprehensive a nationwide energy-water plan to minimize their CO2 emissions, therefore the authors argue that developing a national water-energy plan under a changing climate should be prioritized in the coming years.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 28, 2017, Pages 453-465, ISSN 2210-6707

An international review of stormwater regulation and practices, especially for low-exposure, landscape irrigation schemes in urban environments, was undertaken with a view to identifying what could be used in Alberta, Canada. A general lack of clear guidance and regulation to manage stormwater quality and potential public health risks was identified, which could be hindering the uptake of stormwater schemes generally.This related to SDG6 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27,2016,Pages 457-466,ISSN 2210-6707,

Broad community support is required to drive progress on SDG 6 and to ensure future water security. This paper explores how social capital, measured by involvement in community organisations, might influence support for alternative water schemes. Research was conducted on a representative sample of Australian adults and highlight the importance of social capital in building engagement in water-related issues.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 430-438, ISSN 2210-6707,

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) infrastructure are conventionally designed based on historical climate data. Yet, variability in rainfall intensities and patterns caused by climate change have a significant impact on the performance of an urban drainage system. Although rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a potential solution to manage stormwater in urban areas, its benefits in mitigating the climate change impacts on combined sewer networks have not been assessed yet. Hence, the goal of the present study was set to evaluate the effectiveness of RWH in alleviating the potential impacts of climate change on CSOs. This relates to SDG 6,11 and 12.
Models of university-utility collaboration.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 27, 2016, Pages 475-483, ISSN 2210-6707,

Climate change, rapid urban population growth, land use change, and public concern with rates and use restrictions complicate water management in the cities of the American West. This paper explores a particular collaborative relationship between university researchers and water utilities, providing solutions to barriers that prevent such collaborations. The authors argue that developing an integrated model for university-utility collaborations is a critical area to focus on to achieve sustainable urban water management and advance the water-related SDGs.