Gender equality and women's empowerment

Gender equality and women's empowerment play a vital role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) outlined by the United Nations. Acknowledging the significance of SDG 5, which explicitly targets gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, it's worth noting that these elements are fundamentally tied to all 17 goals. Each goal, whether it pertains to poverty eradication, quality education, or climate action, is directly or indirectly affected by gender dynamics. Gender inequality inhibits economic growth (SDG 8) by depriving economies of the full potential of half its population, thereby exacerbating poverty (SDG 1) and hunger (SDG 2). Additionally, gender-based discrimination can limit access to quality education (SDG 4) and decent work (SDG 8) for women and girls, further perpetuating inequality. In health matters, gender roles and stereotypes often result in disparities in healthcare access and outcomes (SDG 3). With respect to environmental sustainability (SDGs 13, 14, and 15), women, particularly those in rural areas, bear the brunt of climate change impacts, but they also hold unique knowledge and skills crucial for mitigation and adaptation strategies. Likewise, women's underrepresentation in decision-making roles limits their influence on peace and justice (SDG 16) and partnerships for goals (SDG 17). Thus, achieving gender equality isn't only about justice for women and girls, but also about progress on every SDG. Women's empowerment creates a multiplier effect that boosts economic growth and promotes sustainable development, thereby setting a direct path towards achieving the SDGs. Encouragingly, concerted efforts worldwide are recognizing and amplifying women's roles in society, placing gender equality and women's empowerment at the heart of the SDGs. Such advancements signify a positive stride towards a balanced and equitable world.

Elsevier, The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, August 2021
Digital health, including the use of mobile health apps, telemedicine, and data analytics to improve health systems, has surged during the COVID-19 pandemic. The social and economic fallout from COVID-19 has further exacerbated gender inequities, through increased domestic violence against women, soaring unemployment rates in women, and increased unpaid familial care taken up by women—all factors that can worsen women's health. Digital health can bolster gender equity through increased access to health care, empowerment of one's own health data, and reduced burden of unpaid care work.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, August 2021

This Viewpoint describes a feminist intersectionality framework to tackle digital health's gender inequities and provide recommendations for future research.
This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining sex differences in hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampus-dependent cognition, in both healthy individuals and in those with AD, and how these differences are affected by age, hormones, APOE genotype, and experience.
Elsevier,

Sex and Gender Differences in Alzheimer's Disease, 2021, Pages 233-267

This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining the biological and social reasons women are disproportionately affected by mental health issues. It advocates for a gender-based approach to mental health programs to help women with the unique set of challenges they face.
This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by summarizing the evidence from recent multidomain lifestyle intervention trials, and the intervention response observed in men and women. While there have been insightful advancements in the field, many important questions still remain. Considerations for future research and risk reduction initiatives are also highlighted.
This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining the effects of pregnancy on COVID-19 and the different maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidities.
This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by examining the immunological adaptation to pregnancy with a special focus drawn on the susceptibility to viral infections, especially COVID-19.
Disruptions to cancer screening services have been experienced in most settings as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideally, programmes would resolve backlogs by temporarily expanding capacity; however, in practice, this is often not possible. We aim to inform the deliberations of decision makers in high-income settings regarding their cervical cancer screening policy response. We caution against performance measures that rely solely on restoring testing volumes to pre-pandemic levels because they will be less effective at mitigating excess cancer diagnoses than will targeted measures.
Elsevier, The Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific, Volume 12, July 2021
Factors influencing child marriage. All the factors except “physical and mental maturity for marriage” promote child marriage
Background: Rohingya girls living in the refugee camps in Bangladesh are disproportionately vulnerable to child marriages and teenage pregnancies. This study examines the factors affecting child marriage and contraceptive use among Rohingya girls who have experienced child marriages. Methods: We collected and analysed quantitative and qualitative data from adolescent Rohingya girls (age 10-19 years) who experienced child marriages.
Background: Criteria for low-dose CT scan lung cancer screening vary across guidelines. Knowledge of the eligible pool across demographic groups can enable policy and programmatic decision-making, particularly for disproportionately affected populations. Research Question: What are the eligibility rates for low-dose CT scan screening according to sex and race or ethnicity and how do these rates relate to corresponding lung cancer incidence rates?

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