Human rights

Human rights, inherent to all individuals regardless of nationality, sex, ethnicity, or any other status, play a pivotal role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) outlined by the United Nations. These 17 global targets, established in 2015, envision a future where poverty, inequality, and climate change are eradicated, with human rights at the core. Goal 1, for example, aims to end poverty in all its forms, a direct echo of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 25, asserting the right to an adequate standard of living. Similarly, Goal 5 of the SDGs, aimed at achieving gender equality, is intimately linked with the human right to non-discrimination, as stipulated by Article 2 of the Declaration. Climate action, Goal 13, is interconnected with the rights to life, health, and development, making climate change not just an environmental issue, but a human rights issue. The eradication of hunger, goal 2, links with the right to food, and quality education, goal 4, enshrines the right to education. Each SDG, directly or indirectly, resonates with one or more human rights, demonstrating the inextricable tie between them. The realization of human rights, in turn, contributes to the achievement of the SDGs, as it leads to social justice, peace, and sustainable development. Thus, any strategy for the successful implementation of the SDGs must place a particular emphasis on the respect, protection, and fulfillment of human rights. It is vital to recognize that the SDGs and human rights are not separate agendas, but intertwined elements of a broader, universal commitment to a more equitable, sustainable, and inclusive world.

Elsevier,

Pediatric Clinics of North America, Volume 70, Issue 6, 2023, Pages 1087-1102

This chapter advances Goals 3 and 5 by discussing health care providers' opportunity for ARA prevention using a universal education approach that provides information on healthy and unhealthy relationship behaviors and ARA resources.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Archaeology, Second Edition, Volume 1, 2024, Pages 535-538

This chapter advances Goals 4 and 10 by discussing the relationship between human rights and archaeology. The relation between death, war and heritage is also discussed, as a fundamental concern of archaeology's theory and praxis that seldom turns out to be helpful to the public's concerns or needs.
The persistent challenge of aligning mental health services and practices with the principles of the National Mental Health Law remains a central objective.
Examines social equity dimensions of transport policies, including human rights to mobility and road safety. Assesses different governments' policy approaches in relation to these human rights.
Elsevier,

Lancet Regional Health - Americas, Volume 25, September 2023

This Personal View supports SDG 3 and 10 by explaining how children's health outcomes in the USA could be improved by adhering to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child - ie, adopt policies that promote children's rights and wellbeing. This would help to address the comparatively poor health outcomes of children in the USA despite the high per-capita health spending.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 11, September 2023

This Comment article supports SDG 3 and 10 by highlighting that additional calls to action to further safeguard the lives and welfare of LGBTQ+ people are urgently needed; unified commitments that reflect the core values of the Sustainable Development Goals and basic human rights are crucial for ensuring the welfare of LGBTQ+ populations globally.

Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 11, September 2023

This Comment article supports SDG 3, 6, and 16 by referencing the damage to crucial water and sanitation infrastructure due to the armed conflict in Sudan, thus increasing the likelihood of diarrhoeal disease.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Global Health, Volume 11, September 2023

This Comment article supports SDG 3 and 10 by calling on all countries to urgently prioritise strengthening resilient and equitable health systems to achieve universal health coverage, framing universal health coverage as a matter of health, rights, and justice, as well as a key enabler of human security.
This Viewpoint supports SDG 3 and 10 by describing the health effects of settler colonial erasure and racial capitalist exploitation, arguing that widespread epistemic and material injustice, long noted by marginalised communities, is more apparent and challengeable with the consistent application of these two frameworks.
The chapter advances Goals 5 and 10 by educating mental health providers on how to provide culturally sensitive care to all women.

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