Human rights

Human rights, inherent to all individuals regardless of nationality, sex, ethnicity, or any other status, play a pivotal role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) outlined by the United Nations. These 17 global targets, established in 2015, envision a future where poverty, inequality, and climate change are eradicated, with human rights at the core. Goal 1, for example, aims to end poverty in all its forms, a direct echo of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 25, asserting the right to an adequate standard of living. Similarly, Goal 5 of the SDGs, aimed at achieving gender equality, is intimately linked with the human right to non-discrimination, as stipulated by Article 2 of the Declaration. Climate action, Goal 13, is interconnected with the rights to life, health, and development, making climate change not just an environmental issue, but a human rights issue. The eradication of hunger, goal 2, links with the right to food, and quality education, goal 4, enshrines the right to education. Each SDG, directly or indirectly, resonates with one or more human rights, demonstrating the inextricable tie between them. The realization of human rights, in turn, contributes to the achievement of the SDGs, as it leads to social justice, peace, and sustainable development. Thus, any strategy for the successful implementation of the SDGs must place a particular emphasis on the respect, protection, and fulfillment of human rights. It is vital to recognize that the SDGs and human rights are not separate agendas, but intertwined elements of a broader, universal commitment to a more equitable, sustainable, and inclusive world.

The eighth official RELX SDG Inspiration Day was held virtually on May 9, 2022. The event gave thought leaders, corporate representatives, investors, governments, and NGOs a common platform to discuss the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 16, namely, “Peace, justice and strong institutions”. Several notable keynote speakers and panellists shared their insights on how to achieve this goal and the current challenges that need to be resolved to do so.
This content aligns with Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities by exploring the ways in which LCCs make possible a new generation of air traveler that previously did not have access to aeromobility. It discusses how the expansion of low-cost carriers in a region of marked socioeconomic inequality unsettles the privileged origins of flying as a means of transport, complicates the mundane position of flying as a form of mobility, and brings to the surface questions of identity, class, and race among the flying public.
Providing affordable access to enough healthy and safe food for an ever-more-affluent and growing world population has become more challenging in the face of climate change, rising income inequality and a more uncertain global trade environment. Agriculture is expected to contribute more, but is under pressure in both high-income and developing countries to do so more sustainably and inclusively. This paper reviews the roles of food policy in this changing setting.
Elsevier,

Pandemic Risk, Response, and Resilience: COVID-19 Responses in Cities Around the World, 2022, Pages 207-217

This chapter advances Goals 16, 10, and 3 by assessing the livelihoods of the Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh with particular reference to the 2020 pandemic and discussing the growing tension between the refugees and the local Bangladeshis.
A viewpoint, in support of SDGs 3 and 10, discussing the general neglect within global health scholarship of the intersection between health inequities and LGBT+ populations in low-income and middle-income countries in Africa.
Elsevier, The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Volume 10, April 2022
Elsevier, Heart Rhythm O2, Volume 3, April 2022

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