Science

The role of science in achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) cannot be overstated. Science, technology, and innovation are instrumental to addressing the significant challenges encompassed within the 17 SDGs, ranging from poverty and inequality to climate change and biodiversity loss.

Science underpins our understanding of the challenges our world faces and is pivotal in SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and 15 (Life on Land), where understanding ecosystems, environmental degradation, and climate change is paramount. Research in the Earth and environmental sciences provides us with knowledge about the severity of these issues and potential mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Furthermore, in SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), science in the form of medical research and biotechnology contributes to the development of treatments and preventive measures for various diseases. Vaccines, therapeutic drugs, and disease prevention techniques have been made possible due to advancements in biological and health sciences.

Moreover, technological advancements and innovative solutions, often rooted in science, are essential to achieving SDG 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation), and SDG 9 (Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure). From developing renewable energy technologies to creating systems that enhance water and sanitation accessibility, science serves as the bedrock of these innovations.

Science also plays a critical role in SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) by improving agricultural methods, crop yields, and food storage. Through genetic engineering and modern farming techniques, scientists can help increase food security and reduce world hunger.

Finally, science is integral to SDG 4 (Quality Education). A well-rounded education should include a robust scientific curriculum that fosters critical thinking, problem-solving, and a deep understanding of the world. Furthermore, by promoting scientific literacy, societies are better equipped to make informed decisions about policies and practices that affect sustainable development.

To make strides in achieving the SDGs, the scientific community, policymakers, and society must work together. The integration of science into policy-making processes is fundamental in developing and implementing sustainable and impactful strategies that move us closer to accomplishing these ambitious yet achievable goals.

Background: Hippocampus segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging is of key importance for the diagnosis, treatment decision and investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders. Automatic segmentation is an active research field, with many recent models using deep learning. Most current state-of-the art hippocampus segmentation methods train their methods on healthy or Alzheimer's disease patients from public datasets. This raises the question whether these methods are capable of recognizing the hippocampus on a different domain, that of epilepsy patients with hippocampus resection.
Elsevier,

Materials and the Environment, Third Edition: Chapter 11 - Renewable materials, natural materials, Volume , 2021

This book chapter advances SDGs 9 and 12 by exploring whether renewable materials, derived wholly or in part from nature, can play a larger role in the engineering economy of the 21st century.
Elsevier,

Sex Differences in Cardiac Diseases, Elsevier, 2021, Pages 481-503

This book chapter advances SDG 3 and 5 by explaining how women have an increased risk of certain chronic autoimmune inflammatory disorders (CIDs). All aspects of the heart’s structure and function may be affected by the autoimmune disease.
Elsevier,

Sex Differences in Cardiac Diseases, Elsevier, 2021, Pages 671-687

This book chapter addresses SDG 3 and 5 by describing specialized cardiovascular care for women, delivered in “women’s heart programs” (WHPs) focus on the cardiovascular needs of women. This chapter reviews the historical background leading to their development, their structure and specialized areas of focus including referral criteria for unique cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in women, and CVD disorders resulting in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with pathophysiologies seen exclusively, and/or more commonly in women.
This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 13: Climate Action by describing the role of ocean mixing shapes the contemporary mean climate and how advances in our understanding of dynamic mixing processes improves predictions change.
This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 13: Climate Action by highlighting the Southern Ocean's role in global ocean dynamics and ameliorating climate change.
Elsevier,

Sex Differences in Cardiac Diseases, Pathophysiology, Presentation, Diagnosis and Management, 2021, Pages 3-6

This chapter advances goals 3 and 5 by outlining the history and progress of women’s inclusion in cardiovascular clinical trials.
Elsevier,

The Lancet HIV, Volume 8, January 2021

A Viewpoint article, in support of SDG 3, discussing how a therapeutic cure for HIV could address persistent unmet needs associated with current treatment and prevention strategies.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 26, December 2020
Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration has been increasing in the last two decades and, as a major greenhouse gas, it has been linked to global warming and climate changes. Capture and conversion of CO2 into fuels and chemicals offer opportunities to mitigate the increasing CO2 buildup, while simultaneously adding value to CO2. The main limitation in CO2 conversion is its high thermodynamic stability, thus requiring catalysts and energy input to drive the transformation.
Elsevier, Sustainable Chemistry and Pharmacy, Volume 18, December 2020
In this essay some important forerunners of green chemistry will be discussed and compared with the present state. The relationship to ethics will be considered. Starting from the new movement of green chemistry by Anastas, some important highlights will be presented. The new activities of IUPAC and other institutions on the concepts of metrics for green syntheses will be discussed. The prime importance of the inclusion of developing African countries into the concepts will also be covered.

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