Science

The role of science in achieving the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) cannot be overstated. Science, technology, and innovation are instrumental to addressing the significant challenges encompassed within the 17 SDGs, ranging from poverty and inequality to climate change and biodiversity loss.

Science underpins our understanding of the challenges our world faces and is pivotal in SDG 13 (Climate Action) and SDG 14 (Life Below Water) and 15 (Life on Land), where understanding ecosystems, environmental degradation, and climate change is paramount. Research in the Earth and environmental sciences provides us with knowledge about the severity of these issues and potential mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Furthermore, in SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), science in the form of medical research and biotechnology contributes to the development of treatments and preventive measures for various diseases. Vaccines, therapeutic drugs, and disease prevention techniques have been made possible due to advancements in biological and health sciences.

Moreover, technological advancements and innovative solutions, often rooted in science, are essential to achieving SDG 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), SDG 6 (Clean Water and Sanitation), and SDG 9 (Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure). From developing renewable energy technologies to creating systems that enhance water and sanitation accessibility, science serves as the bedrock of these innovations.

Science also plays a critical role in SDG 2 (Zero Hunger) by improving agricultural methods, crop yields, and food storage. Through genetic engineering and modern farming techniques, scientists can help increase food security and reduce world hunger.

Finally, science is integral to SDG 4 (Quality Education). A well-rounded education should include a robust scientific curriculum that fosters critical thinking, problem-solving, and a deep understanding of the world. Furthermore, by promoting scientific literacy, societies are better equipped to make informed decisions about policies and practices that affect sustainable development.

To make strides in achieving the SDGs, the scientific community, policymakers, and society must work together. The integration of science into policy-making processes is fundamental in developing and implementing sustainable and impactful strategies that move us closer to accomplishing these ambitious yet achievable goals.

Elsevier and the International Solar Energy Society (ISES) are pleased to announce the third biennial Renewable Transformation Challenge. If you have an innovative proposal which contributes to the goal of transitioning to 100% renewable energy, submit your application for a chance to win €20,000.
Disruptions to cancer screening services have been experienced in most settings as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideally, programmes would resolve backlogs by temporarily expanding capacity; however, in practice, this is often not possible. We aim to inform the deliberations of decision makers in high-income settings regarding their cervical cancer screening policy response. We caution against performance measures that rely solely on restoring testing volumes to pre-pandemic levels because they will be less effective at mitigating excess cancer diagnoses than will targeted measures.
To show the importance of climate action and to celebrate the more than 5-year collaboration between the Elsevier Chemistry journals department and the Elsevier Foundation, we have compiled this special issue, highlighting top chemistry content related to SDG 13 and providing information on past winners of the Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge.
This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 13: Climate Action by highlighting how past marine ecosystem changes can improve our understanding of future climactic and chemical conditions of global oceans.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 29, June 2021

Microplastic pollution has sparked interest from researchers, public, industries, and regulators owing to reports of extensive presence of microplastics in the environment, household dust, drinking water, and food, which indicates chronic exposure to organisms within ecosystems and in human living spaces. Although exposure to microplastics is evident, negative effects from microplastics appear to be minimal in most studies on biota, and no risk assessments have been completed for microplastics on human health.

Background: Skin diseases that cause chronic pruritus can have negative effects on a patient's quality of life. Objective: We evaluated the associations between chronic pruritus and psychological conditions including insomnia and depression. Methods: This study included responses from 91 participants with chronic pruritus (response rate: 74.6%).

Background: Ovarian cancer continues to have a poor prognosis with the majority of women diagnosed with advanced disease. Therefore, we undertook the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) to determine if population screening can reduce deaths due to the disease. We report on ovarian cancer mortality after long-term follow-up in UKCTOCS. Methods: In this randomised controlled trial, postmenopausal women aged 50–74 years were recruited from 13 centres in National Health Service trusts in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland.
Elsevier,

Environmental Systems Science, Theory and Practical Applications, 2021, Pages 89-133

This book chapter addresses SDG 13 and 15 by explaining an approach to environmental and human health risk from a systems perspective. It introduces exposure assessment methodologies, identifying failures of conventional methods. The chapter explains possible ways to augment them to address the large uncertainties in assessing and managing the risks to humans and ecosystems from chemicals and microbes.
To mark World Environment Day 2021, RELX’s Global Head of Corporate Responsibility, Dr Márcia Balisciano, talks to Dr Dan Fiscus and Dr Brian Fath about this year's theme: Ecosystem Restoration. 
Elsevier,

Earthquakes and Sustainable Infrastructure, Neodeterministic (NDSHA) Approach Guarantees Prevention Rather Than Cure, 2022, Pages 77-95

This book chapter addresses SDGs 9 and 11 by explaining how prediction and prevention of earthquake-related disasters are key to creating sustainable cities.

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