Climate Change

Climate change, a global phenomenon characterized by alterations in weather patterns, rising global temperatures, and an increase in extreme weather events, poses a significant challenge to sustainable development and directly impacts the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs, a collection of 17 interlinked global goals designed as a "blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all" by 2030, are intrinsically connected to climate action.

Central to this relationship is SDG 13: Climate Action, which calls for urgent measures to combat climate change and its impacts. This goal acknowledges that without immediate and sustained action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the achievement of other SDGs is at risk. Climate change exacerbates existing challenges such as poverty (SDG 1), hunger (SDG 2), and health issues (SDG 3) by disrupting livelihoods, food security, and health conditions. For instance, increased temperatures and changing precipitation patterns affect crop yields, leading to food insecurity. Similarly, the spread of diseases is influenced by climatic conditions, directly impacting public health.

Furthermore, climate change has a disproportionate impact on vulnerable populations, including those living in poverty, exacerbating inequalities (SDG 10). It affects access to clean water (SDG 6) and sanitation, with changing weather patterns disrupting water supply. The degradation of natural habitats and ecosystems under climate stress threatens life below water (SDG 14) and life on land (SDG 15), leading to biodiversity loss and affecting the livelihoods of those dependent on these ecosystems.

The economic impacts of climate change are also profound, affecting sustainable industrialization (SDG 9) and undermining economic growth (SDG 8). Severe weather events cause extensive damage to infrastructure and lead to economic losses, while changes in climatic conditions can impact industries such as agriculture, fishing, and tourism.

Moreover, climate change poses challenges to achieving sustainable cities and communities (SDG 11) as urban areas face increased risks of flooding, heatwaves, and air pollution. This necessitates the development of resilient infrastructure and adaptive urban planning. Additionally, the energy sector, integral to most economic activities, must transition towards clean and renewable sources (SDG 7) to mitigate climate change, highlighting the interdependence of the SDGs.

Global partnerships (SDG 17) are crucial in addressing climate change, as it is a global issue requiring international cooperation and funding. Developed countries are urged to support developing nations in climate mitigation and adaptation efforts, recognizing the shared responsibility and differing capacities among nations.

Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, Volume 42, December 2021

The mounting research on consumer behavior and climate change is gradually improving our understanding of effective ways to mobilize consumers to mitigate climate change. The relationship between consumer behavior and climate change is complex and most consumers are not capable of determining which behavior changes are worth doing. Research has come a long way identifying the most impactful behavior changes, but more research is needed to refine and situate these insights.

Elsevier,

The Lancet Public Health, Volume 6, November 2021

A Viewpoint on Europe's response to climate change, in the context of SDGs 12, 13, and 17, focusing specifically on the use of region-specific indicators to address the main challenges and opportunities of Europe's response in the context of public and planetary health.
This book chapter advances SDGs 2, 13, and 15 by summarizing the impact of high temperature on wheat production, physiological traits contributing to heat tolerance, and how to integrate new tools such as trascriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and ionomics with plant breeding.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 50, Pages A1-A8, 1-318 (June 2021)

This special issue of Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability (COSUST) brings together a collection of articles on environmental sustainability in relation to those adverse climate impacts –slow onset events--which unfold gradually over time. The special issue helps identify the gaps and challenges in understanding slow onset events and their local, national, and regional impacts, and possible approaches to manage these.
Elsevier,

The Journal of Climate Change and Health, 2021,100062

Day for Tomorrow: a parallel to Earth Day to join in community for education regarding about disaster preparedness and the need to tackle climate change.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Public Health, Volume 6, September 2021

An Editorial on the importance of mitigating climate change, in the context of SDGs 3 and 16, calling for urgent governmental action to achieve climate justice.
Elsevier,

Global Environmental Change, Volume 70, September 2021

The purpose of the present paper is to disentangle the mechanisms that connect climate change-induced disasters, inequality and vulnerability by accounting for both directions of causality. We do so by means of a simultaneous equations approach on a panel of 149 countries from 1992 to 2018. The empirical analysis reveals that countries with higher levels of income inequality suffer greater damages when hit by a natural disaster. At the same time, inequality is found to increase the number of people affected by disasters.

Elsevier,

 

The Journal of Climate Change and Health, Volume 4, 2021, 100048

This exploratory study examines parental opinions about receiving climate change information at their child's checkup.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Microbe, Volume 2, Issue 9, 2021, Page e415,

This Editorial highlights the relationship between climate change, fires, floods and infectious diseases.
A Personal View in support of SDGs 13 and 16, discussing the promise and limitations of framing climate change as a human health issue to create greater impact on policy makers and to accelerate the shift from evidence to policy action.

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