Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.
SDG resources - poster

The Blueprint for Business Leadership on the SDGs aims to inspire all business to take leading action in support of the achievement of all Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

SDG 17 is concerned with official development assistance and partnerships for the goals. This paper examines the tension that arises between foreign aid agencies delivering on their altruistic commitments whilst at the same time serving the national interests of donor governments.
This article analyses the interplay between inter-State obligations to increase scientific knowledge, develop research capacity and transfer marine technology in accordance with several targets relating to Goal 14, Life below water.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 54-61

Accountability and adaptive management of recent global agreements such as the Sustainable Development Goals and Paris Climate Agreement, will in part rely on the ability to track progress toward the social and environmental targets they set. New approaches that have the potential to match the necessary scale of monitoring, with sufficient accuracy and at reasonable cost, are emerging. Iterative review and adaptation of analytical approaches and available technology will certainly be needed to continuously design ways to best track our progress with regards to addressing the SDG's.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 26-31

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the United Nations present a novel approach to global governance where goal-setting features as a key strategy. While the SDGs hold a great potential, their collective success will depend on a number of institutional factors such as the extent to which states formalize their commitments, strengthen related global governance arrangements, translate the global ambitions into national contexts, integrate sectoral policies, and maintain flexibility in governance mechanisms.
This journal article addresses goals 11, 14, 15 and 17 by looking at biodiversity conservation in modern zoos and the One Health framework.
This paper analyzes the impact of data gap in Millennium Development Goals’ (MDGs) performance indicators on actual performance success of MDGs. It underlines the need to strengthen the performance measurement system attached to the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In particular it is relevant to SDG 9 Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure, SDG 16 Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions and SDG 17 Partnership for the Goals.
This articles addresses SDG 17 - Partnerships for the SDG's. It highlights the needs of joint involvement of various sectors, using as an example The Converging World (TCW) partnership model which currently links south-west England and Tamil Nadu, raising funds for wind turbines in India to avert emissions from conventional sources and reinvesting operating surpluses into forest restoration. In this case the developing-developed world partnership offers equal opportunities in addressing the Climate Action element of SDG 13, serving as an example of positive partnerships in fulfilling the SDGs.
Although one of the poorest countries in the world, Rwanda has achieved most of its Millennium Development targets for health. The major mechanisms for implementation of government policies, with the support of development partners, have been the provision of relatively local health centers, payment of health providers by results, setting up an affordable health insurance scheme and the appointment of volunteer Community Health Workers. The effectiveness of this level of community involvement suggests that the SDGs may also be attainable. This article informs the achievement for SDG 3 and its targets.

Pages