Biodiversity and ecosystems

This journal article addresses goals 7, 11, 12 and 15 by discussing how increased demand for biomass for bioenergy purposes may lead to a continued conversion of valuable habitats into productive lands and to intensification, which both have negative effects on biodiversity.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 399-410

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14, 15 and 17 by discussing the definition of biodiversity that is both scientifically sensible and universally applicable; this is imperative to help guide the design of policy and programs for the future, as well as to make critical decisions in the present.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 691-699

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14 and 15 by discussing how global declines of amphibians refer to the phenomenon of the population declines and even extinctions of amphibian species around the world.
Elsevier,

Encyclopedia of Biodiversity (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 681-707

This book chapter addresses goals 13, 14, and 15 by discussing the biodiversity of mammals, covering all ranges from a shrew to the blue whale.
Elsevier,

Biomass and Bioenergy, Volume 35, Issue 10, 15 October 2011, Pages 4390-4398

This journal article addresses goals 7, 13 and 15 by discussing how wood residues from forest harvesting or disturbance wood from wildfire and insect outbreaks may be viewed as biomass “feedstocks” for bioenergy production to help reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.
Elsevier,

General and Comparative Endocrinology, Volume 157, July 2008

All organisms respond to environmental cues that allow them to organize the timing and duration of life history stages that make up their life cycles. Superimposed on this predictable life cycle are unpredictable events that have the potential to be stressful. Environmental and social stresses have deleterious effects on life history stages such as migration, reproductive function and molt in vertebrates. Global climate change, human disturbance and endocrine disruption from pollutants are increasingly likely to pose additional stresses that could have a major impact on organisms.

Pages