Biodiversity and ecosystems

Elsevier, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Volume 70, 1 April 2017
This literature review identifies the impacts of different renewable energy pathways on ecosystems and biodiversity, and the implications of these impacts for transitioning to a Green Economy. While the higher penetration of renewable energy is currently the backbone of Green Economy efforts, an emerging body of literature demonstrates that the renewable energy sector can affect ecosystems and biodiversity.
Green waste left over from vegetable harvesting provides feed for sheep and is then returned to the soil as manure
Livestock has disappeared from swathes of England in the past 50 years as many growers became increasingly specialised. However as our soils increasingly suffer leaching, erosion and compaction from ever-heavier modern machinery, more and more arable farmers are reaping the benefits of bringing sheep and cattle back on to the land. Such measures help support SDG 12 Responsible Consumption and Production.
This book chapter advances SDGs 15 and 2 by discussing basic soil physical, chemical, and biological properties and explores the interrelationships between different soil properties and functions as essential building blocks for a healthy functioning soil system.
The past decade has witnessed a burst of study regarding antibiotic resistance in the environment, mainly in areas under anthropogenic influence. Therefore, impacts of the contaminant resistome, that is, those related to human activities, are now recognized. However, a key issue refers to the risk of transmission of resistance to humans, for which a quantitative model is urgently needed. This opinion paper makes an overview of some risk-determinant variables and raises questions regarding research needs.
Elsevier,

Agricultural Systems (Second Edition), Agroecology and Rural Innovation for Development, 2017, Pages 33-72

This book chapter addresses goals 11, 15, 12 and 13 by examining the ecological principles that provide a foundation for resilient and sustainable agriculture that supports rural livelihoods.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

Elsevier,

Methods in Stream Ecology: Third Edition, Volume 1, 20 February 2017

This book chapter advances SDG 14 by providing an overview of the methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. The development of spatially explicit predictive models provides a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes, which is integral for the sustainable management of freshwater systems.
Elsevier,

Methods in Stream Ecology: Third Edition, Volume 1, 20 February 2017

This book chapter advances SDG 14 by outlining the use of behavioral observations, gut content and fecal analyses, morphological measurements, and stable isotopes for drawing inferences about the trophic ecology of stream fishes. These methods allow insights at the level of individuals, populations, communities, and entire food webs. Using multiple methods in concert provides a rich perspective on how dietary differences among fish species affect stream ecology.
Natural World Heritage Sites (NWHS), via their formal designation through the United Nations, are globally recognized as containing some of the Earth's most valuable natural assets. Understanding changes in their ecological condition is essential for their ongoing preservation. Here we use two newly available globally consistent data sets that assess changes in human pressure (Human Footprint) and forest loss (Global Forest Watch) over time across the global network of terrestrial NWHS.
Natural World Heritage Sites (NWHS), via their formal designation through the United Nations, are globally recognized as containing some of the Earth's most valuable natural assets. Understanding changes in their ecological condition is essential for their ongoing preservation. Here we use two newly available globally consistent data sets that assess changes in human pressure (Human Footprint) and forest loss (Global Forest Watch) over time across the global network of terrestrial NWHS.

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