Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

Food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture constitute fundamental elements that contribute significantly to the attainment of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These goals are a globally shared blueprint that calls for peace and prosperity for all people and the planet. Focusing on food security and nutrition is directly linked to SDG 2 which seeks to "End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture." Beyond SDG 2, these themes also relate to other SDGs such as Goal 3 - Good Health and Well-being, Goal 12 - Responsible Consumption and Production, and Goal 13 - Climate Action. The relationship between sustainable agriculture and these goals is profound; by promoting eco-friendly farming methods, we reduce the environmental footprint, mitigate climate change, and ensure the long-term sustainability of food production systems.

Moreover, sustainable agriculture is vital in fostering biodiversity, improving soil health, and enhancing water use efficiency, which are critical aspects related to Goals 14 and 15 - Life below Water and Life on Land respectively. By safeguarding our ecosystems, we not only ensure food security but also the preservation of the natural environment for future generations. In turn, better nutrition is a conduit to improved health (SDG 3), and it can also influence educational outcomes (SDG 4), given the known links between nutrition and cognitive development.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that the interconnections go beyond these goals. There's an important nexus between sustainable agriculture, food security and issues of poverty (SDG 1), gender equality (SDG 5), clean water and sanitation (SDG 6), and economic growth (SDG 8), among others. Sustainable agriculture creates job opportunities, thus reducing poverty levels. By empowering women in agriculture, we can help achieve gender equality. Proper water and sanitation practices in agriculture can prevent contamination, ensuring clean water and sanitation for all. Therefore, the triad of food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture, while being a significant goal in itself, is also a vehicle that drives the achievement of the wider Sustainable Development Goals.

Elsevier,

Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, Volume 71, May 2022

There is clear evidence that lifestyle factors affect iron bioavailability. However, information regarding the effect of alcohol and caffeine consumption on iron metabolism is limited.
This paper concludes that the LC (Learning Circle) approach is an inclusive and respectful way of engaging community and promoting local and traditional foods, knowledge, and practices among Indigenous youth in rural and remote locations.
Milk alternatives are compared from an environmental and nutritional point of view for more sustainable food systems.
The goal of global food security will be achieved only by improving the qualitative and quantitative traits of crops through exploitation of metabolic pathways involving advanced analytical tools and technologies.
Aquaculture has been viewed as a potential pathway to healthy and sustainable diets by increasing global nutrient-rich food production while minimizing environmental impacts. Here, we explore environmental and nutritional synergies, trade-offs, and constraints that illuminate the role of aquaculture to deliver on this double bottom line.
In the journey towards attaining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), large scale organic farming has emerged as a strategy of increasing significance.

On April 22 every year, we celebrate the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement with Earth Day. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, this day has marked global collaboration and awareness of the need to fight for a cleaner and healthier Earth. It all began in 1962 when Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring hit the New York’s bestseller list selling over 500,000 copies in 24 countries.

An Article in support of SDGs 2 and 10, analysing global inequalities in the double burden of malnutrition and its association with economic and social globalisation, showing that the probability of the double burden of malnutrition at the household level differs across country income and household wealth.
This paper focuses on limiting food waste by measuring consumers' willingness to eat aging produce.
This Special Issue highlights publicly available journal articles and book chapters focusing on various humanitarian issues related to the crisis in the Ukraine and other countries.

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