Diversity and inclusion

Who wants to become a business leader? We investigated whether young adults' work values (i.e., the importance placed on different job characteristics and rewards) predict their entrepreneurial aspirations (i.e., the intention to create a venture) and leadership aspirations (i.e., the intention to become a leader in a business context). Furthermore, we illuminated whether gender differences in work values contribute to the pervasive gender gap in these aspirations.
This viewpoint emphasizes gendered perspectives and reflects on gender roles for sustainability-focused governance. It argues that when considering gender in this context, not only equity, or power-plays between genders are at stake; in addition, for effective ocean governance, an irreducible contribution of female voices is necessary. Some key contributions of women in the field of ocean governance-related research are described as examples. If women, for instance, are not included in fisheries management, we miss the complete picture of social-ecological linkages of marine ecosystems.
Mothers are often perceived as key agents in safeguarding the interests of children. If the assumption that women, given the opportunity, are more likely than men to see to the interests of children is true, children can be expected to be less exposed to severe forms of deprivation in countries where women have a relatively strong position in society. The hypotheses that fewer children are exposed to health deprivation and to severe forms of food deprivation in countries where there is a high degree of gender equity are tested.
Elsevier, Neuron, Volume 99, 22 August 2018
As scientists and engineers, we must recognize the overwhelming evidence that we each harbor bias that influences our professional decisions. Yet, solving today's increasingly complex public health challenges requires diverse perspectives from multidisciplinary teams. We all have the opportunity to actively promote a more representative scientific community; let's harness the power of collective action to build diverse teams that deliver the most innovative science. Research shows that we all harbor bias that influences professional decisions.
Stop harrasment #metoo
As employers continue to deal with the fallout of the #MeToo movement, the importance of effective sexual harassment training has become more clear. Having a workplace that is free of sexual harassment supports SDGs 5, 8 and 10. This article provides advice on why effective sexual harassment training is needed now more than ever, and best practices that apply no matter where you are.
This chapter addresses SDG5, SDG10, and SDG16 by examining inequality through the lense of individuals' positions of advantage or disadvantage of a social hierarchy and how that influences their propensity toward agency and communion.
A still from the film 'Landline' showing a young farmer doing maintenance on his Land Rover
In the traditional farming community many homosexual farmers are struggling in silence with their sexuality. In a profession where suicide rates are among the highest in the UK, a new film is aiming to break the silence. This helps support SDG 3 (good health and well-being) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities).
Despite extensive literature on the complex nature of empowerment, current efforts to measure women's empowerment in the agricultural development sector are largely limited to assessing visible forms of agency. We take a critical look at current efforts to measure women's empowerment at the individual/household level through standardized tools. We examine the results of a household survey conducted in Nepal using the Women's Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI), which was developed as a monitoring and evaluation tool for the Feed the Future Initiative.
Despite the fact that getting a job with a living wage decreases the risk that an individual will commit another crime, society places many barriers to people with criminal records re-entering the workforce. SDGs 8 and 10 includes bringing the formerly incarcerated back as contributing members of society by providing meaningful work. SDG 5 also is impacted, as bias against women with criminal histories is greater than against men. A new study reveals that misconceptions that prevent employers from considering job applicants with criminal histories are not supported by the data; these workers prove to be as good or a better “quality of hire” than employees without a criminal record.
This book chapter advances SDGs 10 and 13 by explaining how current psychological perspectives on social identity, identity-based motivation, and belonging help shape public engagement and identify key social psychological processes that may contribute to persistent and substantial disparities in the environmental sector.

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