Diversity and inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are essential tenets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives designed to address various social, economic, and environmental challenges. These concepts are not only integral to specific SDGs but also permeate the entire framework, emphasizing the need for equitable and inclusive approaches in all aspects of development.

SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality) are directly connected to the principles of diversity and inclusion. SDG 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. This involves taking measures to ensure the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, regardless of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. It calls for the elimination of discriminatory laws, policies, and practices, providing equal opportunities and reducing disparities, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SDG 5 focuses on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. This goal underscores the need for ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, and it involves various targets including the elimination of violence, ensuring women's full participation in leadership and decision-making, and guaranteeing equal rights to economic resources. By promoting gender equality, SDG 5 directly contributes to the broader objective of creating inclusive societies.

Furthermore, diversity and inclusion are crucial in achieving SDG 4 (Quality Education), which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This involves addressing disparities in access to education and ensuring that vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations, receive equal opportunities for education. Inclusive education is a foundation for building more inclusive societies, as it prepares all individuals to participate fully in their communities and economies.

SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) also embodies the values of diversity and inclusion. It promotes sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. This includes advocating for equal pay for work of equal value, promoting safe and inclusive working environments, and reducing the gender pay gap. By ensuring that all individuals have access to decent work opportunities and are treated fairly in the workplace, SDG 8 plays a pivotal role in advancing inclusive economic growth.

The pursuit of diversity and inclusion is indispensable for realizing the vision of the SDGs. These principles are not confined to specific goals but are woven throughout the entire framework, reflecting the understanding that a fair, sustainable, and prosperous world can only be achieved when all individuals, regardless of their background or circumstances, have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from development. The SDGs recognize that addressing inequalities, empowering marginalized groups, and ensuring inclusive participation are essential for sustainable development, and they call on all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, civil society, and individuals, to work towards these objectives.

Elsevier, International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Volume 61, January 2021
Substantial systemic barriers to care exist for Black, Latino, Asian, and other communities of color, as well as low-resourced populations. Yet, few parent-mediated or parent education interventions specifically target ethnically, racially, or socioeconomically diverse families of children with autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual and developmental disabilities (ASD/IDD). Furthermore, the ASD/IDD literature is lacking guidance on methods to culturally adapt interventions to attend to families' unique strengths and challenges.
Elsevier, Advances in Child Development and Behavior, Volume 60, January 2021
Research conducted over the last century has suggested a role for sleep in the processes guiding healthy cognition and development, including memory consolidation. Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) tend to have higher rates of sleep disturbances, which could relate to behavior issues, developmental delays, and learning difficulties.

Children and youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are at increased risk for obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and a host of other co-morbidities. By adulthood, this population is at very high risk for multiple co-morbidities that significantly shorten life expectancy and have negative impact on quality of life. Despite these disparities, children and youth with I/DD have limited access to resources and opportunities to engage in programming that appropriately address their needs.

Elsevier,

International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, Volume 61, January 2021

People with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), experience unique circumstances that alter their risk for and experiences of violence and abuse. In particular, people with disabilities may be at risk for two forms of disability-related abuse: (1) denial of assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., eating, dressing, toileting) and (2) denial of assistive technology (e.g., mobility aids, medical devices, communication devices).

Surveys research on policies to reduce violence against women in transport context. Identifies data gaps and recommends ways to improve policy evaluation.
In this article, we describe how the black ceiling—upheld by the powerful institutional logics of patriarchy and white supremacy, inordinately challenging and interlocking systemic barriers to leadership advancement—leads to the dearth of Afro-Diasporic women in senior corporate leadership positions and pathologizes Afro-Diasporic women as multiple outsiders.
Elsevier, Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology, Volume 50, 1 January 2021
Elsevier, Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Volume , 2021
Objective: Health disparities are pervasive in nursing homes (NHs), but disparities in NH end-of-life (EOL) care (ie, hospital transfers, place of death, hospice use, palliative care, advance care planning) have not been comprehensively synthesized. We aim to identify differences in NH EOL care for racial/ethnic minority residents. Design: A systematic review guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses and registered in PROSPERO (CRD42020181792).
Objective: To define the current proportion of underrepresented minority (URM) academic urologists in leadership positions. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study of leadership positions in active United States Urology Residency Programs in 2020 was conducted. Academic urologists in leadership positions were electronically mailed a survey asking about personal and professional demographics. Self-reported variables including administrative position, race, and ethnicity were collected and analyzed.

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