Diversity and inclusion

Diversity and inclusion are essential tenets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives designed to address various social, economic, and environmental challenges. These concepts are not only integral to specific SDGs but also permeate the entire framework, emphasizing the need for equitable and inclusive approaches in all aspects of development.

SDG 10 (Reduced Inequalities) and SDG 5 (Gender Equality) are directly connected to the principles of diversity and inclusion. SDG 10 aims to reduce inequality within and among countries. This involves taking measures to ensure the social, economic, and political inclusion of all, regardless of age, sex, disability, race, ethnicity, origin, religion, or economic or other status. It calls for the elimination of discriminatory laws, policies, and practices, providing equal opportunities and reducing disparities, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

SDG 5 focuses on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. This goal underscores the need for ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, and it involves various targets including the elimination of violence, ensuring women's full participation in leadership and decision-making, and guaranteeing equal rights to economic resources. By promoting gender equality, SDG 5 directly contributes to the broader objective of creating inclusive societies.

Furthermore, diversity and inclusion are crucial in achieving SDG 4 (Quality Education), which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. This involves addressing disparities in access to education and ensuring that vulnerable populations, including persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, and children in vulnerable situations, receive equal opportunities for education. Inclusive education is a foundation for building more inclusive societies, as it prepares all individuals to participate fully in their communities and economies.

SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) also embodies the values of diversity and inclusion. It promotes sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. This includes advocating for equal pay for work of equal value, promoting safe and inclusive working environments, and reducing the gender pay gap. By ensuring that all individuals have access to decent work opportunities and are treated fairly in the workplace, SDG 8 plays a pivotal role in advancing inclusive economic growth.

The pursuit of diversity and inclusion is indispensable for realizing the vision of the SDGs. These principles are not confined to specific goals but are woven throughout the entire framework, reflecting the understanding that a fair, sustainable, and prosperous world can only be achieved when all individuals, regardless of their background or circumstances, have the opportunity to contribute to and benefit from development. The SDGs recognize that addressing inequalities, empowering marginalized groups, and ensuring inclusive participation are essential for sustainable development, and they call on all stakeholders, including governments, businesses, civil society, and individuals, to work towards these objectives.

Elsevier,

Research in Organizational Behavior, Volume 34, 2014, Pages 3-25.

Developing SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), this article offers a critical review of four dominant scholarly frames that have informed LGBT organizational research from the late nineteenth century to date. These frames include medical abnormality, deviant social role, collective identity and social distinctiveness views of sexual minorities.
To maximize potential, people must have lifelong access to the information and services offered through books and libraries. Whether to address concerns of an ageing population or to enable all citizens to contribute fully through meaningful education and work opportunities, more emphasis is being given to promoting library services to people who have disabilities. This content addresses SDGs 4 and 10 by focusing on serving adults with disabilities in an international setting allowing librarians, policy makers and constituents to understand the importance of serving all potential patrons.
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 383, Issue 9916, 8–14 February 2014, Pages 500-502.

SDG 3 (good health and well-being), SDG 10 (reduced inequalities) and SDG 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) are all directly relevant to this research. This report investigates the health consequences of rising anti-gay laws and homophobia in seemingly liberal nations.
Elsevier,

Women and Health (Second Edition), 2013, Pages 1515-1526

Addresses the impact of long-term care on women, outlining the salient issues affecting women who are receiving care and those who are providing informal caregiving, as well as those who are direct care workers in long-term care facilities. Focus is given to the prevalence of physical and mental health conditions among women in the long-term care system and identification of risk factors associated with women’s health and economic well-being.
Summarizes the evidence on how education, work, and marriage influence women’s health. In light of dramatic changes in gender-based inequalities in education, occupational opportunities, and marriage, trends in major indicators of women’s health are discussed in relation to the relevance of social changes for recent and future population patterns in women’s health.
A growing body of literature supports stigma and discrimination as fundamental causes of health disparities. Stigma and discrimination experienced by transgender people have been associated with increased risk for depression, suicide, and HIV. Transgender stigma and discrimination experienced in health care influence transgender people's health care access and utilization. Thus, understanding how stigma and discrimination manifest and function in health care encounters is critical to addressing health disparities for transgender people.
While we know that minority status differentiates the experience of aging, little research has been done to examine the ways in which patterns of successful aging may differ in diverse subgroups of older adults. In this exploratory study, we investigated and described experiences of successful aging in a sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Directed by a community-based participatory research process, we conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 22 LGBT adults, age 60 and older.
This content aligns with Goal 3: Good Health as well as Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities by examining drivers of RIDS in treated HIV infection.
This content aligns with Goal 3: Good Health as well as Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities by reviewing key advances in the field of neuropathogenesis and studies that have highlighted how molecular diversity within the HIV genome may impact HIV-associated neurologic disease.
Objectives: Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations exhibit elevated rates of psychiatric disorders compared to heterosexuals, and these disparities emerge early in the life course. We examined the role of exposure to early-life victimization and adversity-including physical and sexual abuse, homelessness, and intimate partner violence-in explaining sexual orientation disparities in mental health among adolescents and young adults. Methods: Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Wave 3 (2001-2002), a nationally representative survey of adolescents.

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