Supporting goal 10 (reduced inequalities), goal 8 (decent work and economic growth) and goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions) this blog discusses the fight for social justice and the links with inclusion and decent work for migrants in a global economy.
Social impact
At the World Economic Forum in Davos on Thursday 24 January, Theresa May called on shareholders to put pressure on the companies they invest in to improve their "social impact" supporting goal 10 (reduced inequalities) and goal 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions).
The Government's scheme for individuals to apply for tribunal fees refunds has been rolled out to all applicants, after a "successful opening phase of the scheme". This reduces inequalities between richer and poorer employees and between richer companies and poorer employees contributing to SDG 10.
Anti Slavery Day
Modern slavery risks have risen across the world over the last year, including in 20 of the 28 member states of the EU. On Anti-Slavery Day, this blog looks at the increased risks and numbers of victims of forced labour in supply chains, and how to mitigate these risks contributing to goal 8 (decent work and economic growth).
This paper examines the trends in famine over the last 150 years, with particular attention to the fusion of famine with forcible mass starvation. It identifies four main historic periods of famines, namely: the zenith of European colonialism; the extended World War; post-colonial totalitarianism; and post-Cold War humanitarian emergencies; and asks whether we may be entering a fifth period in which famines return in new guises. The paper explores structural causes of famine vulnerability, the overlapping but distinct causes of food crises and excess mortality in those crises, and the proximate triggers of famine. While noting that almost all famines have multiple causes, with no individual factor either necessary or sufficient, the paper focuses on the growing significance of political decision and military tactics in creating famine. It is an important review of the causes related to hunger and therefore to help advance SDG 2.
This paper extends the debate about redressing persistent gender inequality in Australia by examining the relationship between labour productivity and the wage gap in all states and territories (1986–2013). It is a critical case study as Australia’s widening gender wage gap is contrary to other developed nations. This article looks to address SDG 5 (gender equality) and SDG10 (reduced inequality).
Demise of correspondent banking relationships - SDG Resource Centre
Correspondent banking is the cornerstone of the global payment system, designed to serve the settlement of financial transactions across country borders. It allows companies and individuals to safely move money around the world and supports and encourages global trade. Since the financial crisis, tighter regulations - and in particular the regulatory penalties imposed for violations of anti-money laundering (AML) – have caused western banks to rethink their global strategy. The risks of doing business in many developing nations are beginning to be seen as outweighing the financial benefits brought by correspondent banking activity. As a result, US and European banks have reduced their correspondent banking activity in the riskiest regions.
SDG target 10.3 is concerned with eliminating discriminatory laws. In the UK, it has been successfully argued before an employment tribunal that a discrimination claim - thrown out during the fees regime because the claimant did not pay - should be revived. This sets a precedent for reducing inequalities based on the ability to pay.
Afghanistan has prioritised the achievement of universal health coverage, drawing attention to underserved groups such as people living with disabilities. This study analyses the progress of improving health care coverage for people with disabilities, between 2005 and 2013, using the indicators availability of health care, as well as perceived coverage of health needs. As part of SDG 3.8, this study helps shape policy for improving the provision of health care for people with disabilities.
West Africa has the highest proportion of married adolescents, and the highest adolescent childbearing rate and maternal death rate in sub-Saharan Africa. Using data from 19 211 women across 13 west African countries, this survey-based study reports that while many adolescents use some antenatal care for their first birth, they seek care later, make fewer visits during pregnancy, and receive less comprehensive care than older first-time mothers.

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