Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development

Many countries are experiencing economic benefit from a surge in tourism, but once pristine landscapes are changing and local communities rarely benefit from the tourism, and instead run the risk of losing their livelihoods. Researchers in Thailand are investigating “creative tourism” – creative, sustainable approaches to tourism, that enable producers and consumers to relate and get value from their connections. This supports the tourism elements of SDGs 8, 12 and 14.
Photos of a beach on Henderson Island in the Pacific Ocean provides yet more evidence of the detrimental impact that packaging and other plastics waste is having on the environment globally. Creating a virtuous circle out of what, until now, has largely been a chain of production from feedstock to consumer will not be easy. But it is the innovation aspect that has fired the imagination of producers, processors and corporate consumers of plastics packaging. This fits with SDG 9.4 to upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes and SDG 7 Affordable and Clean Energy.
Ocean Observations
The 'Marine Technology and Services Sector Role' track from the Oceanology International 2016 conference provides the latest trends in ocean observing, viewed through the lens of the 'Blue Economy'. Presentations from a range of experts provide new perspectives and identify key trends that will influence future developments. Stewardship of the seas is vital SDG 14.2 to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts.
Reed Exhibitions,

Oceanology International 2016, 13-15 March 2016

Marine Renewables
The Marine Renewables Conference at Oceanology International 2016 heard from industry experts about recent innovations in modelling, surveying and foundation design, and new techniques and technologies in offshore surveying. The conference included presentations on the novel foundation systems which are being deployed to support offshore wind, tidal and wave energy projects globally. Information about latest technologies and techniques support SDG 7 and SDG 14, to harness renewable energy whilst protecting oceans and seas.
Reed Exhibitions,

Oceanology International 2016, 13-15 March 2016

Green Shipping
The Green Shipping panel discussion at Oceanology International 2016 explored the impact of invasive species carried across the seas not only inside ships and shipping containers, but also attached to hulls. Invasive species have been identified as one of the four greatest threats to the world’s oceans. Highlighting issues relating to shipping and invasive species helps to advance SDG 14.2 to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems to avoid significant adverse impacts.
Reed Exhibitions,

Oceanology International 2016, 13-15 March 2016

Aquaculture
The Aquaculture Conference at Oceanology International 2016 brought together industry experts to explore the latest challenges faced by the aquaculture sector. The themes explored include fish health, containment, environmental security, marine biofuel development and spatial planning. Advancing techniques in these areas helps to advance SDG 14.4 to effectively regulate harvesting and end overfishing, illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing and destructive fishing practices and implement science-based management plans.