Maintaining or restoring connectivity among wildlife populations is a primary strategy to overcome the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation.

Perspective showing food access, affordability, and consumption must be considered in addition to consumption to avoid blind spots on blue food provision.
Restoring forest cover is a prominent option for climate mitigation.
Elsevier, Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, December 2020
The Baltic Sea is essential for marine ecosystem services (MES) provision and the region's socio-economic dynamics. It is considered one of the busiest and most polluted regional seas in Europe.
Rewilding should be central to the massive restoration efforts needed to overcome the global biodiversity crisis and enhancing the biosphere's capacity to mitigate climate change.
Elsevier, One Earth, Volume 3, 18 December 2020
Earth's ecosystems, upon which all life depends, are in a severe state of degradation.
Caring for lands and waters must become the new bottom line not only for communities and countries but also for businesses and corporations. Investing in the protection and restoration of nature and in equitable outcomes is the most important thing we can do to secure our future. The ten paths outlined here will help us to become responsible and loving caretakers of Earth and each other.
Endocrine disruption is a potential global problem observed not only in heavily polluted areas but also in those considered “pristine”. There is particular concern about the exposures of wildlife to mixtures of biologically active chemicals, which, combined with other stressors, may play an even greater role in reproductive disorders.
This article highlights the winning proposals of the fifth edition of the Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge. The winning proposals were chosen for their innovative green chemistry aspects and their large positive impact on the environment, contributing to SDGs 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14 and 15.
2018 Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge second prize winner, Dr. Alessio Admiano
In 2018, Dr. Alessio Adamiano, a researcher for the Italian National Research Council at the Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramic Materials,  was awarded the second prize of €25,000. Contributing to SDGs 2, 13 and 14, his project, “Phos-Fate: Empowering fishing communities for climate change”, demonstrated how phosphorous can be recycled in a simple, scalable way by converting fish bones into products such as fertilizers. Two years later, we interviewed Dr. Adamiano about his experience at the Challenge, as well as the upcoming steps for his project empowering fishing communities for climate change.

Pages