Elsevier,

Biometals in Neurodegenerative Diseases, Mechanisms and Therapeutics, 2017, Pages 1-17

This chapter addresses goal 3 by discussing the potential of targeting biometals in Alzheimer's disease as a therapeutic avenue.
Elsevier,

Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, Volume 46, Issue 3, May–June 2017, Pages e56-e64

SDG 3 includes the target 3.1: is to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030. In this article, the authors describe the global factors that contribute to maternal mortality rates, outcomes of the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals, and the new, related Sustainable Development Goals. Implications for clinical practice, health care systems, research, and health policy are provided.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 1, Issue 2, May 2017, Pages e48-e49

This brief article presents a renewed and strengthened version of Kate Raworth’s well-known Doughnut model, which describes the social and ecological boundaries to human wellbeing. The model shows twelve dimensions and their illustrative indicators are derived from internationally agreed minimum standards for human wellbeing, and it relates to nearly all of the SDGs.
With so many adults living with a serious mental health impairment, it is important to create a good mental health work environment for employees. These eight steps can be used to create a good mental health work environment for employees, while at the same time maintaining compliant policies and practices. The goal of SDG target 3.4 is to reduce premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being.
Prince Harry
With so many adults living with a serious mental health impairment, it is important to create a good mental health work environment for employees. This article examines how mental health issues can impact the workplace. The goal of SDG target 3.4 is to reduce premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being.
Open defecation is a major global health problem. The number of open defecators in India dwarfs that of other states and most live in rural places. Attempts to end rural open defecation by targeting individuals, like social marketing or behaviour change approaches, often ignore the structural inequalities that shape rural residents’ everyday lives. Our study explores the role of remoteness in sustaining open defecation in rural India, advancing knowledge on SDG 6. We deploy the concept of remoteness as an analytical tool that can capture everyday practices of open defecation as a function of physical and social distance.
This study illustrates how consumer social risk footprints can assist in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For their social footprint, The authors select 4 indicators related to five of the UN's SDGs: gender equality (SDG 5 also 8.5 & 8.8); mother and child health (SDG 3, especially 3.1 & 3.2); governance (SDG 16, especially 16.5 & 16.6); and access to clean water (SDG 6, especially 6.1 & 6.2). The results discussed are important for the UN in developing partnerships to address the SDG's and for organisations such as the World Bank, Trade Unions and NGOs' work towards a fairer world.
Contributing to SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), this Elsevier Atlas Award winning article examined whether caregiving within and beyond the family is related to mortality in older adults.
Although one of the poorest countries in the world, Rwanda has achieved most of its Millennium Development targets for health. The major mechanisms for implementation of government policies, with the support of development partners, have been the provision of relatively local health centers, payment of health providers by results, setting up an affordable health insurance scheme and the appointment of volunteer Community Health Workers. The effectiveness of this level of community involvement suggests that the SDGs may also be attainable. This article informs the achievement for SDG 3 and its targets.
Cancer is a major cause of death in children worldwide, and incidence is increasing. This population-based study from the International Agency for Research on Cancer in collaboration with the International Association of Cancer Registries aimed to provide internationally comparable local data on the incidence of childhood cancer. This study observed geographical, racial and ethnic, age, sex, and temporal variations in childhood cancer which require further monitoring and research. These data can be used to inform aetiological research, to inform public health policy and to advance SDG 3 target 4.

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