In a world where the demand for energy continues to rise and fossil-fuel reserves become more depleted each day, we desperately need new clean energy resources to keep pace with the demand. Renewable energy generated via wind, solar, geothermal, and tidal power will help to reduce our CO2 emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050, but implementing these resources is challenging. In this Catalysis piece, Kaltsoyannis and Liddle explore the role that nuclear power will play in the future. In particular, they discuss the major problems associated with nuclear power and how chemists and fundamental chemical research can take a lead role in providing solutions to make it clean and support SDG 7. This catalyst article generates two reaction responses from Dame Sue Ion and Dr. Robin Taylor.
California-based Facebook is planning to build two data centres measuring 184,000 square metres in Denmark’s third largest city. This could push up total Danish power demand by a 10%, and accelerate investments in wind production. Increasing the production of wind power and other renewables contributes to the advancement of SDG target 7.2 to increase the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.
In the latest Catalysis piece, Professor Leif Hammarström from Uppsala University discusses one potential solution to SDG 7: utilizing the power of the sun to generate clean energy. This overview catalyzes a response from Professors Bolsen, Druckman, and Cook on the impact that accommodating such change would have on society.
Elsevier,

Social Science & Medicine, Volume 167, October 2016, Pages 1-10

Energy insecurity is a multi-dimensional construct that describes the interplay between physical conditions of housing, household energy expenditures and energy-related coping strategies. Energy insecurity leads to adverse environmental health and social consequences. Energy insecurity merits more attention in research and policy.
On-site energy storage systems can be used in both domestic and commercial buildings to address the increasing demand on electricity. This would require energy to be purchased at off-peak times and stored for use during peak times. Despite a number of benefits to on-site energy storage systems, they are not yet an economically viable solution, although by 2021 costs are expected to fall significantly. Future-proofing buildings in the form of battery technology supports SDG 7 - affordable and clean energy.
This research is a comparative study to assess the impact of techno socioeconomic factors on the sustainability of two microhydro power projects in Indonesia. Given the results of the study, hydropower could be considered as the solution to the electricity problems faced in Indonesia, and would contribute to the advancement of SDG 7.2 to substantially increase the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix.
Access to clean and stable energy is a major challenge for many developing African countries. This research aims to investigate ways in which financing renewable energy projects (REPs) can help to address this problem and therefore SDG7. The authors propose the promotion of the two-hand renewable energy service company (ESCO) model as an efficient financial vehicle for increasing sustainable economic development through the production of reliable and stable electricity in semi-urban and rural communities.

In 2010, 10 percent of the global primary energy demand was met by bioenergy production. The demand for bioenergy, excluding traditional uses, could more than double by 2035. Bioenergy business operators are essential for the sustainable development of bioenergy systems. This study examines their sustainability criteria and offers insights into how their approach could mature. This is important for advancing SDG target 7 to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all.

This paper discussed the main challenges and opportunities related to Active Distribution Networks (ADNs) control, with particular reference to voltage regulation and lines congestion management. Secondly it discusses the main principles and operation of the Grid Explicit Congestion Notification Mechanism (GECN). Examining ADNs improves understanding of SDG 7.

Energy geotechnics involves the use of geotechnical principles to understand and engineer the coupled thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes encountered in collecting, exchanging, storing, and protecting energy resources in the subsurface. In addition to research on these fundamental coupled processes and characterization of relevant material properties, applied research is being performed to develop analytical tools for the design and analysis of different geo-energy applications. This paper summarizes some of the major research and practical developments in the emerging area of energy geotechnics which relates to SDG 7, 11 and 13.

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