Achieving SDG 11 will require new technologies and innovations to be deployed in the real-estate sector. Already blockchain and artificial intelligence form the foundations of smart buildings, using data on residents' personal preferences to be able to improve efficiency and comfort. This article explores the different technologies and innovations that provide significant untapped potential in the real estate sector.
Elsevier,

Energy and Buildings, Volume 116, 15 March 2016, Pages 703-708

The smart grid's components
Target 11.6 aims to reduce the environmental impact of cities. Technological advances in electric power grid infrastructure, the smart grid, means a greener, more efficient and more adaptable grid. The relationship with the building and the community is explored in this paper to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in the potential of buildings and communities to be integrated in smart grids as well as to discuss the still-open research issues in this field.
Elsevier,

Building and Environment, Volume 97, 15 February 2016, Pages 196-202

Heat map of simulated annual heating demand for South Boston using UMI (a) and daily gas and electricity demand profiles for the highlighted building in South Boston (b).
Targets to reduce GHG emissions in cities require significant political willpower. Transportation and industrial activity have varying contributing factors to GHG in cities, while emissions from buildings is always a key contributor. Understanding building emissions is important in achieving SDG 11 and SDG 13. This article reviews both individual building energy models and regional and country-level building stock models as a way of analysing the energy performance of neighbourhoods.
Key strategies to low energy buildings
The behaviour of a building's occupant has a significant impact on the energy consumption of that building. Behaviour patterns of building occupants are uncertain but social scientists have been studying behaviour patterns for decades. Drawing on this research, this paper explores advances and obstacles in modelling occupant behaviour and the impact this can have on measuring energy consumption. Target 11.6 is concerned with reducing the adverse impacts of cities, therefore understanding and being able to predict occupant behaviour will play an important role in achieving this target.
The internal combustion engine does not efficiently convert chemical energy into mechanical energy and most of the energy is lost as heat. This paper discusses promising technologies for passive waste heat recovery system, addressing SDGs 9,12 and 13.
Membrane (bio)fouling is a major problem in separation and purification processes. This paper highlights recent advances in the design and development of highly resistant thin film composite membranes through surface modification. This is particularly relevant to SDG 6 (ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all) and the related innovations in design make this relevant for SDG 9 (build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation) as well.
High performance, cost-effective and environmentally acceptable separation systems is highly desirable in tackling the sustainability challenges facing current desalination technology. This paper provides a brief insight into the roles and prospective of nanotechnology, particularly the nano-enabled membrane technology, to serve as a key element to render feasible solutions for sustainable development in membrane desalination technology. This relates to SDG 6 and 9.
Recent research on CO2 capture is focusing on the optimization of CO2 absorption using amines (mainly monoethanolamine—MEA) in order to minimize the energy consumption of this very energy-intensive process and improve the absorption efficiency. This paper provides an overview of the main implications of using MEA for CO2 capture together with the latest advances in research to improve the conventional absorption process. The use of other solvents and/or technology, as well as their advantages and disadvantages will also be briefly provided. This is relevant for SDGs 9,12 and 13.
Granite Powder (GP) and Iron Powder (IP) are industrial byproducts generated from the granite polishing and milling industry in powder form respectively. These byproducts are left largely unused and are hazardous materials to human health because they are airborne and can be easily inhaled. This study, as well as studies in other countries, have shown the viability of producing concrete with granite powder and iron powder byproducts. This supports the advancement of SDG 9 and SDG 11.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Power Technologies and Infrastructure, Chapter 10, 2016, Pages 355–377

This chapter advances both goals 7 (affordable and clean energy) and 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure) through its discussion of incentives and tariffs that encourage sustainable infrastructure, including renewable energy.

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