Food security and nutrition and sustainable agriculture

Food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture constitute fundamental elements that contribute significantly to the attainment of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These goals are a globally shared blueprint that calls for peace and prosperity for all people and the planet. Focusing on food security and nutrition is directly linked to SDG 2 which seeks to "End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture." Beyond SDG 2, these themes also relate to other SDGs such as Goal 3 - Good Health and Well-being, Goal 12 - Responsible Consumption and Production, and Goal 13 - Climate Action. The relationship between sustainable agriculture and these goals is profound; by promoting eco-friendly farming methods, we reduce the environmental footprint, mitigate climate change, and ensure the long-term sustainability of food production systems.

Moreover, sustainable agriculture is vital in fostering biodiversity, improving soil health, and enhancing water use efficiency, which are critical aspects related to Goals 14 and 15 - Life below Water and Life on Land respectively. By safeguarding our ecosystems, we not only ensure food security but also the preservation of the natural environment for future generations. In turn, better nutrition is a conduit to improved health (SDG 3), and it can also influence educational outcomes (SDG 4), given the known links between nutrition and cognitive development.

Furthermore, it is worth noting that the interconnections go beyond these goals. There's an important nexus between sustainable agriculture, food security and issues of poverty (SDG 1), gender equality (SDG 5), clean water and sanitation (SDG 6), and economic growth (SDG 8), among others. Sustainable agriculture creates job opportunities, thus reducing poverty levels. By empowering women in agriculture, we can help achieve gender equality. Proper water and sanitation practices in agriculture can prevent contamination, ensuring clean water and sanitation for all. Therefore, the triad of food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture, while being a significant goal in itself, is also a vehicle that drives the achievement of the wider Sustainable Development Goals.

Objectives: The increasing prevalence of malnutrition among school-going adolescents is a major public health threat in Bangladesh. School studying adolescents are a crucial group suffering from malnutrition. Proper nutrition information can enrich their knowledge, promote their health and also minimize the burden of malnutrition. The study aimed to identify the sources of information and corresponding knowledge level on nutrition among school-going adolescents in Bangladesh. Study design: A school-based cross-sectional survey was carried out from January to August 2019.
Meat consumption has been increasing since the 1960s, but especially from the 1980s decade to today. Although meat means an important source of nutrients, it is also evident that a great consumption of this source of proteins has also a negative environmental impact. Livestock production does not only have a negative influence on GHG emissions, but also on the water footprint, water pollution, and water scarcity.
A Viewpoint on recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic, in the context of SDGs 3, 5, and 10, focusing specifically on the benefits of investing in maternal, neonatal, and child health domains, including nutrition.
Harnessing genomic selection for efficient and sustainable livestock production is an important and markable way to address food security challenges.
Elsevier,

Global Food Security,
Volume 27,
2020,
100442,
ISSN 2211-9124,
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2020.100442.

This paper provides an overview of children and adolescents’ diet. Food systems need to be redesigned to improve diet quality in children 0-19 years in order to address the multiple burdens of malnutrition. Data systems also need to be strengthened to track data quality among children. This article advances knowledge on SDG 2 and 3.
Elsevier,

Global Food Security,
Volume 27,
2020,
100443,
ISSN 2211-9124,

This paper describes the relationship between agriculture, food supply chains and children’s and adolescents’ diets and their food accessibility, advancing knowledge on SDG 2, zero hunger.
This book chapter advances SDGs 15 and 11 by reviewing the anthropogenic activities worldwide that have caused ecological degradation resulting in the need to mitigate damage to essential ecosystem services in rural and urban areas.
Elsevier, International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science, Volume 21, October 2020
Entomophagy is increasingly seen as a potential solution to provide a sustainable source of protein. However, the attitude of Western consumers towards insect-based products is generally negative. This study was designed to evaluate the liking of four insect-based snacks among young Italian consumers through a tasting panel involving 62 participants. Two of the products showed the whole insects, while the other two contained insect flour as a main ingredient.
The dichotomous divide between vegetarians and omnivores seems clear: Omnivores eat meat, whereas vegetarians do not. Yet classifying people dichotomously as vegetarian or omnivorous overlooks a distinct group of people who limit their meat intake but still include some meat in their diets: a group of “mostly vegetarian” dieters called flexitarians (a term combining the words, “flexible” and “vegetarian”).

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