Articles

Elsevier, Digital Signal Processing: A Review Journal, Volume 123, 30 April 2022
With the continuous development of human society, people's over-exploitation of nature leads to frequent environmental problems. A large number of floating objects appear on lakes, rivers, reservoirs and other water surfaces. Water floats have seriously damaged the ecological environment and directly threatened the survival and development of human beings. Therefore, for the sustainable development of human beings, we must solve the problem of water pollution. The detection of floating pollutants on water surface is the primary goal of water resource management.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Regional Health - Americas, Volume 8, April 2022

An Article on the vulnerability of Indigenous populations to pandemics, in the context of SDGs 3 and 10, focusing specifically on the clinical characteristics and outcomes following COVID-19 in Indigenous Brazilian individuals.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific, Volume 21, April 2022

A cohort study in Queensland, Australia, in the context of SDG 3 and 10, highlighting the need for culturally appropriate mental health and wellbeing services that meet the needs of Indigenous communities.
Elsevier, The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 6, April 2022
Background: Human impacts on earth-system processes are overshooting several planetary boundaries, driving a crisis of ecological breakdown. This crisis is being caused in large part by global resource extraction, which has increased dramatically over the past half century. We propose a novel method for quantifying national responsibility for ecological breakdown by assessing nations’ cumulative material use in excess of equitable and sustainable boundaries. Methods: For this analysis, we derived national fair shares of a sustainable resource corridor.
Spatial resolution of the geographical information system-based model
Elsevier, The Lancet Planetary Health, Volume 6, April 2022
Background: Increasing air conditioner use for cooling indoor spaces has the potential to be a primary driver of global greenhouse gas emissions. Moving indoor air with residential fans can raise the temperature threshold at which air conditioning needs to be turned on to maintain the thermal comfort of building occupants. We investigate whether fans can be used to reduce air conditioner use and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

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