North America

Research suggests that racial/ethnic disparities in COVID-19 in the US are largely driven by higher rates of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 among Hispanic/Latino and Black populations. Occupational exposures play a large role in structuring risk of exposure, and essential workers are at elevated risk of COVID-19 infection. At a national-level, workers categorized as “essential” and “high-risk” are disproportionately Hispanic/Latino, but we lack analysis examining local-level racial/ethnic disparities in potential occupational exposures.
Elsevier,

Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatry, Volume 5, December 2021

This review article examines the various types of diagnostic biomarkers which are used in the early detection of Alzheimer’s disease and summerizes the A/T/N classification system for Alzheimer’s biomarkers and its use in the biomarker-based diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Furthermore it reviews the use of structural MRI, 18F-FDG PET, Amyloid PET, Tau PET, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, and the emerging role of plasma biomarkers in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. In doing so the authors discuss each biomarkers correlation with pathologic findings, ability to distinguish Alzheimer’s disease from healthy aging, ability to distinguish Alzheimer’s disease from other neurodegenerative diseases, role in A/T/N classification system, and limitations of each biomarker.
This book chapter advances SDG #3 and #10 by reviewing the latest developments in the field of clinical diagnosis and pharmacotherapeutics have provided hope to ameliorate the behavioral changes and cognitive disturbances associated with the disease.
Graph showing differences in energy consumption in the USA
The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated energy insecurity and economic hardship among vulnerable populations. This paper provides robust empirical evidence of the degree to which COVID-19 mitigation measures, especially the mandates of school closure and limiting business operations, have impacted electricity consumption behavior in low-income and ethnic minority groups in the United States. We use a regression discontinuity design applied to individual-consumer-level high-frequency smart meter data in Arizona and Illinois to highlight the disparities in mitigation measure impacts.
Elsevier, International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 85, November 2021
Ethnic-racial socialization is a mechanism through which immigrant parents instill in their children a sense of pride in their culture while preparing them for negative experiences with racial and cultural out-groups. For Black immigrant parents, this can include promoting a wariness of Black Americans in their children. Through this lens, we investigated an understudied intercultural dynamic via interviews with 12 first- and second-generation African and Caribbean immigrants.
This content aligns with Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities by examining the social determinants of health and access to adequate oral healthcare.
Looks at the mental health of the Black community in the USA in response to police brutality. Ties to reduced inequalities, peace and justice, good health and wellbeing for all.
Elsevier,

The Journal of Climate Change and Health, Volume 5, 2022, 100092

As both COVID-19 and climate change crises converged and even contributed to each other, a much older crisis reemerged: structural racism and the policy stagnation that refuses to address it. 
Background: Many states in the United States (US) have introduced barriers to impede voting among individuals from socio-economically disadvantaged groups. This may reduce representation thereby decreasing access to lifesaving goods, such as health insurance. Methods: We used cross-sectional data from 242,727 adults in the 50 states and District of Columbia participating in the US 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). To quantify access to voting, the Cost of Voting Index (COVI), a global measure of barriers to voting within a state during a US election was used.
Elsevier,

The Journal of Climate Change and Health,
Volume 3,
2021,
100035

Both short-term and chronic exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) are known to cause a host of adverse health outcomes, including premature death. This paper will review sources, health impacts and health inequities associated with PM2.5, and will frame PM2.5 as both a social and structural determinant of health.

Pages