North America

Directly contributing to both SDG 3 (good health and well-being) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities), this research aims to support therapists who work with young gay and bisexual men to conduct therapy for stress management and HIV prevention.

Partner content

United Nations University, New York, June 2016. 

Contributing to SDGs 3 (Good Health and Well-being) and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals), this concept note explores an integrated approach for the international drug control regime.
Diversity of gender and race within senior management roles leads to better thinking and decisionmaking
More women are entering the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors – but there’s still a way to go. It’s all part of a wider drive to increase diversity in the workforce. This is important for advancing SDG 5.1 to end all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere and SDG 5.5 to ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life.
Elsevier,

Environmental Science & Policy, Volume 55, Part 1, January 2016, Pages 266–273

Sustainable agriculture holds great promise for alleviating a whole host of environmental problems and health risks associated with the modern industrial agricultural system. However, as this paper demonstrates, USDA-funded agroecological research shows tremendous untapped potential. Winning the Elsevier Atlas Award in June 2016, the authors argue that there is an urgent need for increased investments in research and development to make sustainable food production even more beneficial, contributing to SDGs 12, 13 and 15.
This critical review aims to integrate the literature on stigma towards transgender people in the US, contributing to SDG 10 (reduced inequalities). Such stigmas limit transgender access to resources in a number of critical domains including healthcare and employment, impacting SDG 3 (good health and well-being) and SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth).
This paper contributes to the literature on Indigenous health, human dimensions of climate change, and place-based dimensions of health by examining the role of environment for Inuit health in the context of a changing climate. It addresses SDG 3 and 13.
Elsevier,

Health & Place, Volume 31, January 2015, Pages 65-74

Most research on neighbourhoods and health will likely continue to be based upon observational studies, improving their design will advance knowledge generated from this growing field. Increasingly, discussions about strengthening this evidence base is being linked to other design and analytic strategies such as inclusion of instrumental variables, propensity scoring and use of natural experiments to further our understanding of the impact of place on health. We have described here several methodological issues that shaped the design considerations of the NEHW study to ensure that, while it is a cross-sectional sample, it will still advance the quality of evidence emerging from observational studies. This addresses SDG 3.
Developing SDG 10 (reduced inequalities) and SDG 3 (good health and well-being), this study evaluates a possible developmental trajectory in LGBT distress and the factors that might influence distress over time.
This study aims to fill a gap in knowledge, comparing the mental health of transgender adolescents and emerging adults to cisgender youth accessing community-based clinical services, further developing SDG 10 (reduced inequalities) and SDG 3 (good health and well-being).
Mortality Rate Ratios for seniors age 65 and older (MRR65+) by New York City Community District (n=59). The MRR65+ compares mortality rates during very hot days (maximum heat index=100 °F+) to all May through September days, 1997–2006.
The health impacts of exposure to summertime heat are a significant problem in New York City (NYC) and for many cities and are expected to increase with a warming climate. This article explores the connections between health in Goal 3 and climate change in Goal 13.

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