Health and population

Physical inactivity kills more than 5 million people every year through its effects on multiple non-communicable diseases. As such, design of urban environments has the potential to contribute substantially to physical activity. This article documents how attributes of the urban environment are related to physical activity in an international sample of adults. The findings add strength to previous calls for policy changes in the urban planning, transport, and parks and recreation sectors to reduce the health burden of the global physical inactivity pandemic, directly supporting SDG 11 target 7.
This brief article discusses why food procurement—the purchase, preparation, and serving of food in public institutions—is a promising strategy to improve the diet and nutritional health of vulnerable populations. With mounting evidence in high-income countries of the benefits of healthy-food procurement in tackling undernourishment, overnourishment, and chronic diseases associated with the latter such as type 2 diabetes, the challenge now is to translate the lessons learned to middle-income and low-income countries, thereby supporting the goals of SDGs 2, 3, and 12.
One of the SDG 3 targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt by 2025 the rise in the age-standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. This article provides the most complete estimates of trends in adult diabetes prevalence worldwide, and predicts how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target and how changes in prevalence, population growth, and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes. If post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global diabetes target is lower than 1% for men and is 1% for women worldwide.
This article provides the most complete picture of trends in adult body-mass index (BMI), including, for the first time, in underweight and severe and morbid obesity. In addition, authors calculate the probability of meeting the WHO target of halting by 2025 the rise in obesity at its 2010 levels. The results are damning, with authors concluding that if post-2000 trends continue, the probability of meeting the global obesity target is virtually zero. This raises questions for the SDG 3 target related to reducing mortality rates attributed to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes or chronic respiratory disease.
This webinar addresses health and well-being in the workplace, which are issues that are covered by Goal 3
Elsevier,

Systems Neuroscience in Depression, 2016, Pages 29-77

This chapter addresses SDG 3 by discussing the mechanisms behind early life stress being a risk factor for depression.
Elsevier,

Alzheimer's Disease, Life Course Perspectives on Risk Reduction, 2016, Pages 57-73

This chapter addresses goal 3 by examining the prevalence and epidemiology of Alzheimer's Disease.
Nurses receive instruction in mobile nursing education in Kenya through Amref’s Jibu pilot. (Credit: Amref)
In order to achieve SDG target 3C, investments in the healthcare workforce is essential. New and innovative methods need to be deployed to train and develop the skills of healthcare workers. In Kenya, AMREF has launched a programme that enables nurses to learn on their mobile phones through a mobile nursing education app. Supported by a three-year grant from the Elsevier Foundation, Jibu (the name of the m-learning programme), offers a low-cost yet effective way for nurses to access up to date content.
Food insufficiency is an important, modifiable risk factor for depression. The authors investigate this association using longitudinal data from South Africa. Food insufficiency has a strong association with depressive symptoms. This paper addresses Goal 2 and Goal 3
New born baby being resuscitated
Every year, an estimated 1.8 million newborns die from breathing related problems. Precious time is lost when birth attendants interrupt critical ventilation to check a newborn’s heart rate by hand. Elsevier brought together five experts from diverse fields, who used their skills and creativity to brainstorm a solution. It's one example of a successful multidisciplinary approach, in this case to help the advancement of SDG 3.2, to end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age.

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