Capacity Building

Capacity building represents a fundamental approach in the implementation and achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a set of global objectives adopted by the United Nations in 2015 aimed at addressing various global challenges. The concept of capacity-building revolves around enhancing the skills, abilities, processes, and resources of individuals, communities, and institutions, enabling them to tackle a wide array of issues more effectively.

One of the most direct mentions of capacity building in the SDGs is found in Goal 17, which focuses on strengthening global partnerships to support sustainable development. Specifically, target 17.9 of this goal emphasizes the need for international support in building capacities in developing countries. This is essential for these countries to not only participate in, but also contribute meaningfully to, the global sustainable development agenda.

However, the significance of capacity building extends far beyond SDG 17. It plays a pivotal role in virtually all the other goals due to its cross-cutting nature. For instance, in SDG 4, which aims to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education, capacity building is crucial for empowering educators and learners. By enhancing teaching methodologies and learning environments, and providing access to necessary resources and training, capacity building directly contributes to improving the quality of education.

In the context of SDG 8, which focuses on promoting sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, capacity building is key in equipping the workforce with the necessary skills. This includes vocational training, digital literacy, and entrepreneurship skills, which are vital in the rapidly changing labor market. Such capacity enhancement leads to better job opportunities, increased productivity, and economic growth, particularly in developing economies.

Similarly, for SDG 13, which is centered on taking urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts, capacity building is indispensable. Developing technical skills and knowledge, particularly in the area of environmental management, renewable energy technologies, and climate resilience, is crucial for both mitigating climate change and adapting to its inevitable impacts. This involves training individuals and communities, as well as strengthening institutional capabilities to develop and implement effective climate strategies.

Moreover, capacity building is instrumental in achieving other SDGs, such as SDG 1 (No Poverty), SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), and SDG 5 (Gender Equality). By empowering communities with the skills and resources they need, capacity building fosters self-reliance and enables people to address the root causes of poverty, improve health outcomes, and promote gender equality and women's empowerment.

Capacity building is not just an isolated objective within the SDGs but a fundamental strategy that underpins the entire framework. Its holistic approach ensures that efforts in one area support and reinforce progress in others, creating a more integrated and effective path towards sustainable development. It requires a concerted effort from various stakeholders, including governments, international organizations, the private sector, civil society, and local communities, to share knowledge, expertise, and resources. This collaborative approach is essential for building capacities that are sustainable, context-specific, and aligned with the diverse needs and challenges faced by different countries and communities.

This event primarily focusses on SDG 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure), exploring the technical and engineering challenges of addressing all 17 Sustainable Development Goals.
Sexual and gender based violence (SGBV) is notoriously difficult to investigate and prosecute. SGBV occurs in varied contexts and requires flexibility in the investigative approach in order to develop a strong evidence base to enable successful prosecutions. In this paper we focus on the need for innovation and development of training protocols for gathering testimonial and forensic evidence in SGBV cases, particularly in low resource environments, such as developing countries, displaced communities, and conflict and post-conflict societies.
Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV) in Kenya is highly complex requiring a multi-sectoral approach for comprehensive management. This complexity is worsened by the acceptance of Sexual Violence within a patriarchal society, harmful traditional and cultural practices, breakdown of law and order especially during electoral periods, all heightened by abject poverty. There are numerous programs on interventions costing millions in local and foreign currency, however grave gaps still exist at key levels across all sectors even after years of continued intervention.
To advance goals 8 and 16, this report provides a list of concrete actions that different stakeholder groups — including business, the investor community, Governments, the UN and civil society — can take to scale up business action and investment in high-risk areas. It also provides an overview of eight multi-stakeholder initiatives that support stakeholders in scaling up these actions.
To advance goal 5, this report seeks to bridge the gap in the conversation around gender equality by demonstrating that when more women are in corporate decision-making positions, their companies benefit - as do society and the environment.
Human mobility and inequality have determined one another throughout modern history, from the effects of labour migration to processes of urbanisation. The Sustainable Development Goals now offer an opportunity to re-examine this complex relationship in a globalized world. Drawing on major research evidence and key debates, this review article proposes a framework of mobility equity as part of SDG 10, which foresees the reduction of inequalities within and among countries by 2030.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018
This paper examines the potential and limitations of SDG 5 (Gender Equality) in helping to achieve household food security. The potential lies in the attention it pays to women's access to land and natural resources, which can significantly enhance women's ability to produce and procure food. Its limitations lie in a lack of attention to the production constraints that women farmers face; its failure to recognise forests and fisheries as key sources of food; and its lack of clarity on which natural resources women need access to and why.
As the Millennium Development Goals did earlier, the Sustainable Development Goals have mobilised the international community into what can be the most important, although the most challenging, development goals of the 21st century. However, a main limitation has been that the SDGs considered as a baseline the inaccurate figures that were presented by the UN at the end of the MDGs. These figures were not challenged, not even by the academic community, who in many cases has used them uncritically.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018
Actions on climate change (SDG 13), including in the food system, are crucial. SDG 13 needs to align with the Paris Agreement, given that UNFCCC negotiations set the framework for climate change actions. Food system actions can have synergies and trade-offs, as illustrated by the case for nitrogen fertiliser. SDG 13 actions that reduce emissions can have positive impacts on other SDGs (e.g. 3, 6, 12, 14, 15); but such actions should not undermine the adaptation goals of SDG 13 and SDGs 1, 2, 5 and 10.
Elsevier, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018
The transformational potential of Agenda 2030 lies in the synergies to be found among the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs were designed to be interdependent, requiring enhanced policy coherence for sustainable development, and forests have a prominent role to play in their success.

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