Poverty eradication

Poverty eradication is the central focus of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically highlighted by SDG 1, "No Poverty." The aim is to end poverty in all its forms everywhere by 2030, underlining the necessity of ensuring social protection for the poor and vulnerable, enhancing access to basic services, and supporting people harmed by climate-related extreme events and other economic, social, and environmental shocks and disasters.

However, poverty eradication is intrinsically linked to all the other SDGs due to its pervasive influence. It hinders the achievement of quality education (SDG 4) as children from low-income households often lack access to quality education. In terms of "Good Health and Well-being" (SDG 3), poverty can result in inadequate access to healthcare services, nutritious food, and sanitation facilities, leading to poor health outcomes.

Moreover, "Decent Work and Economic Growth" (SDG 8) is crucial for lifting individuals out of poverty. Creating sustainable work opportunities and ensuring fair wages can lead to improved living conditions and break the cycle of poverty. "Zero Hunger" (SDG 2) is another goal where eradicating poverty plays a significant role since poverty is a primary driver of food insecurity.

From a broader perspective, the concept of sustainable cities and communities (SDG 11) involves creating environments where all citizens, regardless of their income level, can access basic urban services. This includes affordable, secure housing, transportation, and green public spaces.

In terms of climate action (SDG 13), the poor are often the most vulnerable to climate change impacts, despite contributing the least to greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts to mitigate climate change must include strategies to lift people out of poverty.

Diabetic neuropathy is the most debilitating complication that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. It is essential to detect symptoms or signs of diabetic neuropathy and determine risk factors as early as possible to implement interventions and to prevent further neuronal damage. The goal of SDG 3.4 is to reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being 3.4.1 Mortality rate attributed to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes or chronic respiratory disease
This article aligns with the SDG goal 3 of good health and wellbeing and SDG 10 Reduced inequalities by showing the importance of continuing screening for hepatitis and early detection of liver damage, especially in high-risk population groups.
A Personal View in support of SDGs 1, 2, and 13, describing how use of quantitative data can support targeted interventions for nutrition resiliency and suggesting actions that can help to prevent acute malnutrition in the context of worsening climate and conflict conditions.
Elsevier,

Food Security, Poverty and Nutrition Policy Analysis (Third Edition): Statistical Methods and Applications, 2022, Pages 575-597

Building effective policy and practices to ensure sustainable supplies of nutritious foods requires understanding the contributing factors and developing appropriate practices in response.
In this episode of the “World We Want” podcast series, RELX’s Global Head of Corporate Responsibility, Dr. Márcia Balisciano, talks to Michael Sheldrick about leadership.
This review article assesses evidences published in the past two years on the links among slow-onset events, food security and poverty as well as the strategies focused on reducing specific problems, those implemented in the countries of the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. It is here, where slow-onset events related to Climate Change pose significant challenges intricately linked to poverty and food security; mainly as a result of a great economic and social dependence, strongly conditioned by environmental factors.
Purpose: Cancer is a key influence on psychosocial and emotional distress among patients. Problems that advanced cancer patients in the western world face have been widely explored, but these findings may not be applicable in the non-western world due to the cultural differences. Exploring the problems of advanced cancer patients will help professionals plan appropriate therapeutic interventions to take care of the patients' physical, emotional, social and practical needs. Hence, this study aims to explore the psychosocial and emotional problems of advanced cancer patients in India.
Nexis Newsdesk™ has created graphics on the SDGs and the Global Media Landscape, offering charts & insights into global media coverage of the Sustainable Development Goals. View findings for Global Goal 2.
A Research Paper on food insecurity in the UK, in the context of SDGs 1, 2, and 3, focusing specifically on the association between the implementation of austerity policies in 2010 and the increase in foodbank use and food insecurity over the following decade.
Elsevier,

Barefoot Global Health Diplomacy, Field Experiences in International Relations, Security, and Epidemics, 2021, Pages 51-73

Local capacity gives locals the strategic, diplomatic skills they need: capacity and understanding are not necessarily only amongst doctors and politicians, but also amongst community leaders, villagers, and patients. To develop that capacity, that understanding, the locals need new skills, new forms of education

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